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9 st reel ** 



General Manager 

FRANK MILLSPAUGH 

Assistant Managers 

DALE MINOR 

LARRY JOSEPHSON 

Drama and Literature Director 

BAIRD SEARLES 

News Producer 

PAUL FISCHER 

Washington Bureau 

STEVE BOOKSHESTER 

Chief Announcer 

STEVE POST 

Production Director 

FRANK COFFEE 

Special Projects 

ED WOODARD 

Chief Engineer 

TOM WHITMORE 

Recording Engineers 

DAVID RAPKIW 

RICHARD BRAUSE 

Subscription Manager 

FRANC ALTMAN 

Office Manager 

KATHY OOBKIN 

Folio Editor 

ROSE MARY ANDERSON 

Promotion Director 

MOLLY McDEVITT 

NEW YORK BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

DR. HAROLD TAYLOR 

Chairman 

ROBERT GOODMAN 

STEPHEN FISCHER 

ALBERT RUBEN 

LAWRENCE PINKHAM 

MEL GREENBERG 

wbai's listings, in the form of this. Folio, are 
published every month as a service to subscribers 
who support our nonprofit, noncommercial sta- 
tion at the annual rate of $15.00 (student and 
retired persons subscription rate: $10.00 a year). 
All donations are tax deductible and checks should 
be made payable to "Pacifica Foundation — WBAI." 

WBAI is on the air from 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Monday to Friday, and 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 a.m., 
Saturday and Sunday. Our transmitter is located 
in the Empire State Building and we broadcast 
with an Effective Radiated Power of 5.4 KW (hori- 
zontal) and 3.85 KW (vertical). Power equivalent 
to 50,000 watts at 500 feet. Antenna: 1223 feet 
above average terrain. Height above sea level: 
1515 feet. The studio and offices are located at 
30 East 39th Street, New York, N. Y. 10016. 
Phone: OXford 7-2288 (area code: 212). Subscrip- 
tion Department: 34 East 39th Street. Phone: 
OXford 7-4374(5). 

WBAI is owned and operated by the Pacifica Foun- 
dation, a nonprofit institution. The other Pacifica 
stations area KPFA, Berkeley, California 94704, 
and KPFK, Los Angeles, California 90038. Sub- 
criptions are transferable. 

The duration of programs scheduled is approxi- 
mate. The dates after listings indicate past or 
future broadcast. The program listings are copy- 
righted (Copyright 1968, WBAI) and are not to 
be reprinted without written permission. Extracts 
may be reprinted for highlight listings. 

WBAI is not responsible for the return or safety 
of unsolicited tapes or manuscripts. 



October Highlights 



NEWS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

MEDICAL ROULETTE 

October 2, 9 

DRAFT COUNSELING 

October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 

SYMPHONY OF THE NEW WORLD 

October 5 

S. C- U. M. MANIFESTO 

October 12 

SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT: A Community Meeting on Lead Poisoning 

October 14 

RESISTANCE 

October 15 22 28 

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND URBAN AMERICA 

October 16 

FROM BEAUX ARTS TO THE BARRICADES 

October 19 

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND EDUCATION 

October 20 

AVOID VIETNAM IN LATIN AMERICA 

October 23 

INSURGENCY AND GUERRILLAS IN GUATEMALA 

October 26 

AGRICULTURE AND THE NATION 

October 28 

DRAMA AND LITERATURE 

TOMORROW'S PEOPLE 
October 1 

THE BARBED WIRE MAN 
October 5 

THE ENGLISH THEATRE SCENE 
October 6, 21 
DIONYSUS IN 69 
October 7 

A TALK WITH FRITZ LEIBER 
October 8 

THE GORMENGHAST TRILOGY: A discussion with Maeve Peake and Jonathan 
Williams 
October 12 

THE WOR|D PLAYERS: NEW YORK, New York, new york 
October 13 

THE ORACLE: In Memory of David Sandberg and Neil Cassidy 
October 13 

POEMS BY MARTIN WEISS: A Young Poet's Involvement 
October 18 

STEPHEN STEPANCHEV READS HIS POETRY 
October 19 

GUIDE TO THE CENTRAL PARK 
October 24, 31 

HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL: "THE BOTTLE IMP" and "Pickman's Model" 
October 31. 

MUSIC 

1968 SUNDANCE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS 

October 12 

EARLE BROWN 

October 21 

MARATHON JAZZ 

October 29 



OCTOBER 1968 



Volume 9 Number 10 



Folio Notes 



OCTOBER FINANCIAL GOALS 

WBAI's financial goal for October is a nice, round $30,000. 
This means we must get at least 600 new subscriptions and 
the renewals of 1,055 subscriptions that come due this month. 
If your September Folio had a little "1068" in the upper right 
hand corner of the mailing label, this means your renewal is 
due now. Prompt renewals are your insurance against pos- 
sible delay in the delivery of your Folio, so we hope you will 
respond immediately. 

If you are interested in following the daily tally of money 
and subscriptions taken in by WBAI, this information is 
broadcast just before the 6:30 p.m. News. And, for a com- 
plete rundown on the station's doings and undoings, listen to 
Report to the Listener, Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. (rebroadcast 
Sundays at 10:30 a.m.) 

OCTOBER COVER 

Our cover this month is a photograph of a work by Clement 
Meadmore. Mr. Meadmore is an Australian sculptor; he is 
representing (in art) his country at the 1968- Olympics in 
Mexico. The work photographed is entitled UPSTART; it 
was the first work selected by the NYC Parks Department 
Office of Cultural Affairs in its "Sculpture of the Month" 
program. UPSTART was exhibited on the corner of 59th 
Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Other works by Mr. 
Meadmore can be seen during the month of October at the 
Byron Gallery where he is having a one-man show. 

We would like to thank Mr. Meadmore for his support of 
the station and for his donation of a model of the sculpture 
shown on the cover, which was exhibited and sold at WBAI's 
Marathon art show, Jeanne Siegel is preparing an interview 
with Mr. Meadmore that will be scheduled in November. 

PROGRAMMING NOTES 

This month the News and Public Affairs Department pre- 
sents the first programs of three new monthly series, all prod- 
uced by Steve Bookshester of our Washington Bureau. The 
Federal Government and Urban America on October 16 at 
8:00 p.m. (rebroadcast Oct. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) will deal with 
the problems of cities. The Federal Government and Educa- 
tion on October 20 at 9:00 p.m. (rebroadcast Oct. 23 at 1:00 
p.m.) will analyze U. S. programs designed to aid education 
at all levels. Agriculture and the Nation on October 28 at 
8:30 p.m. (Oct. 30, 12:30 p.m.) will look into the workings 
of the federal bureaus and agricultural organizations. These 
descriptions are rather broad; in practice, each program in 
the three series will cover a specific issue, usually with inter- 
views of experts and/or opinion-makers in the area under 
discussion. 

This month News and Public Affairs adds a new commen- 
tator to its roster: H. Rap Brown. Mr. Brown's views have 
been widely quoted and misquoted in the past; WBAI listeners 
can hear him say exactly what he thinks on Friday evenings 
at 8:30 p.m. (rebroadcast Saturdays at 11:15 a.m.). 

Julius Lester, who has stood in for Bob Fass and Steve 



Post on their late night programs and was a Pacifica cor- 
respondent at the Democratic Convention in Chicago, joins 
WBAI this month as a regular program producer. Mr. Les- 
ter's program, The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, will 
originate live in WBAI's studio every Thursday night from 
8:30 to 10:30 and will consist of music, talk, interviews and 
phone calls. We invite everyone (but especially the people 
who wrote in to demand that he be given a regular show) to 
listen. 

The Mind's Eye Theatre, the production unit of the Drama 
and Literature Department, announces a new project: The 
Word Players. In a loose sense the group could be called a 
repertory company but it is unique in several ways — among 
them the fact that The Word Players will create its material 
as it goes along. The aim is to make a form unique to radio 
and The Word Players intend to do so by literally playing 
with words. Choosing a theme, each member will find ma- 
terial on that theme: quotes, literary references, poems and 
short dramatic scenes that will be woven into an aleatoric 
montage that is orchestrated for speaking voices. If this is 
a little hard to imagine, all to the good. The Word Players' 
first production, NEW YORK, New York, new york, will be 
broadcast October 13 at 8:45 p.m. (rebroadcast Oct. 17 at 
12 noon). Also, in honor of Halloween night, the Drama and 
Literature Department has scheduled some programs designed 
to keep you from getting a good night's rest The highlighted 
programs by no means sum up all of the interesting programs 
for this month from D & L, so watch your Folio for programs 
that may be especially interesting to you. 

In November, WBAI will have a new Music Director: Eric 
Salzman. Actually, Mr. Salzman isn't "new" but will be fam- 
iliar to listeners of long-standing as our Music Director in 
1963-64. A former music critic for the New York Herald 
Tribune and the New York Times and contributing editor to 
Hi Fi/Stereo Review, Mr. Salzman is the author of Twentieth- 
Century Music: An Introduction (Prentice-Hall). Mr. Salz- 
man originated "The Electronic Ear", a series for electronic 
music and mixed media at The Electric Circus and is current- 
ly the artistic director of "New Image of Sound", Hunter Col- 
lege's series on contemporary music and arts. 

In addition to these activities, Mr. Salzman is primarily a 
composer. His recent major works include Verses and Cantos, 
a music theater piece with a text by John Ashbery which was 
given a first performance at Hunter in November, 1967, and 
Foxes and Hedgehogs for tape and electronic music. Mr. 
Salzman is currently working on a tape score for dancer 
Daniel Nagrin's The Peloponnesian War and a work for a 
Renaissance ensemble (voices and old instruments) on com- 
mission from Nonesuch-Elektra. 

Mr. Salzman has many exciting and unusual projects in 
store for WBAI. He will describe them in detail next 
month in this space. However, if anyone now knows of a 
large, relatively quiet space in Manhattan that can be obtained 
for little (or, preferably, no) money, call OX 7-2288 and 
ask for the Music Department. 



WBAI 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Why not 

listen to Larry Josephson, as long as 
you're up? 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 

(Sept. 30) 
9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
civil rights attorney to the revolution- 
ary left. (Sept. 30) 
9:30 THE CREATURES OF PROME- 
THEUS, Op. 43 by Ludwig van Bee- 
thoven. Winterthur Symph. Orch./ 
Walter Goehr. (Rarities Collection 
CHS 1063). (Oct. 7) 
10:45 SCRAPS Chris Albertson with a 

mixed bag. (Sept. 30) 
11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Anatomy of the Criminal The man on 
the street talks to the ex-con in an 
interview with two "people at large" 
about their attitudes toward the ex- 
convict and prisons. Produced by Da- 
vid Rothenberg of the Fortune Society. 
(Sept. 30) 
11:30 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #11: A 
Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community Interviews and dis- 
cussion in a continuation of this series 
devoted to a subjective approach to 
the homosexual subculture. (Sept. 30) 
12:00 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD 
News and views by Tana de Gamez. 
(Sept. 29) 
12:30 REPORT ON MUSIC by Alan 
Rich of New York magazine. (Sept. 
29) 
1 :00 NEW YORK CITY An "open" pro- 
gram devoted to problems, issues and 
events in this city. (Sept. 30) 
2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of the Sept. 30 program 
from WBAI's News and Public Af- 
fairs Dept. 
3:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 
r&b, Gospel, and other soul music. 
(Sept. 27) 
4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
Tuesday's Child Bonnie Tepper grace- 
fully tiptoes through WBAI, followed 
by Part I of The Little Prince by An- 
toine St. Exupery, read by Nina Ser- 
rano Landau. 
5:00 GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony No. 
9 Israel Philharmonic Orch. /Paul 
Kletzki (Angel 3526) (Oct. 7) 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 
7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Frank Millspaugh weeps as he re- 
ports on the doings and undoings at 
WBAI. (Oct. 6) 
7:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabri 
cant, Legislative Director of the N.Y. 
ACLU. (Oct. 2) 
7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BLOSSOM SEELEY? The super-star 
of vaudeville's Golden Age talks with 
Richard Lamparski about her closest 
friend, Ruth Etting, and her late hus- 
band, Bennie Fields. Blossom says 
kids today don't get the training they 
need — "there's no place you can be 



lousy anymore." (Oct. 2) 

8:00 LISTENING BACK #18 This week, 
Bob Brown features songs from 
Bombs, original recordings of the 
1929 musical extravaganza which 
starred Al Jolson. (Oct. 2) 

8:30 TOMORROW'S PEOPLE Lee Pen- 
nington talks about his experiences 
teaching poetry in "Bloody Harlan" 
county, Kentucky. This program comes 
to us through the courtesy of Scotty 
D'Arcy and D-J Associates. (Oct. 2) 

9:30 ARTS EXTRA From the Drama and 
Literature Department, a program of 
immediacy which is produced too late 
for detailed listing in the Folio. (Oct. 
2) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 2) 

11:00 SONIA MALKINE WBAI's French 
troubadour sings the songs she loves 
the most . . . French ones. (Oct. 2) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE It gets 
cool at night. With Bob Fass. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Listening 
with Larry, the lovable Ass't. Mngr. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 1) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant. 
(Oct. 1) 

9:30 THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY: Mu- 
sic of the Burgundian School by Du- 
fay, Binchois, Busnois, Morton, de La- 
tins, and Anonymous. Pro Musica Anti- 
qua, Brussels/ Saf ford Cape (Bach 
Guild BG-634) Vocal and Instrumental 
Ensemble/Roger Blanchard (None- 
such H-1058) Philippe Caillard Vocal 
Ensemble/Caillard (Erato LDE 3023). 
(Oct. 9) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BLOSSOM SEELEY? Richard Lam- 
parski speaks with the vaudeville star. 
(Oct. 1) 

11:30 LISTENING BACK #18 Bob 
Brown continues this series with mu- 
sic from his vast collection. Details 
Oct. 1. 

12:00 RALPH SHAPEY: Music and In- 
terview with Ann McMillan. (Sept. 27) 

1:00 TOMORROW'S PEOPLE Lee Pen 
nington talks about his experiences 
teaching poetry in "Bloody Harlan" 
county, Kentucky. (Oct. 1) 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA from the Drama and 
Literature Dept. (Oct. 1) 

3:00 SONIA MALKINE sings and talks. 
(Oct. 1) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLES PROGRAM: 
When the Spirit Says Sing with Bob 
Cohen. Then, The Little Prince, Part 
2. (Parts 3 and 4 will be heard next 
Tuesday and Wednesday). 

5:00 MISSA SANCTAE CAECILAE by 
Haydiu Maria Stader, soprano; Marga 
Hoffgen, alto; Richard Holm, tenor; 
Josef Greindl, bass; Michael Schnei- 



Page 5 

Index of Commentaries 

DORE ASHTON: October 4, 8:45 P.M. 
(Oct. 5, 1:00 P.M.) 

H. RAP BROWN: Fridays, 8:30 P.M. (Sat- 
urdays, 11:15 A.M.) 

CAMPAIGN COMMENTARIES: October 10, 
7:00 P.M. (Oct. 11, 9:15 A.M.) October 
24, 7:00 P.M. (Oct. 25, 9:15 A.M.) 

TANA DE GAMEZ: Sundays, 10:30 P.M. 
(Tuesdays, 12 noon) 

NEIL FABRICANT: Tuesdays, 7:15 P.M. 
(Wednesdays, 9:15 A.M.) 

SAM JULTY: Saturdays, 7:15 P.M. (Sun- 
days, 10:45 A.M.) 

JULIUS LESTER: Sundays, 7:30 P.M. 
(Mondays, 11:00 A.M.) 

CONRAD LYNN: Mondays, 7:00 P.M. 
(Tuesdays, 9:15 A.M.) 

WILLIAM MANDEL: Saturdays, 7:30 P.M. 
(Sundays, 11:00 A.M.) 

JOHN MARSH: Fridays, 8:15 P.M, (Sat- 
urdays, 11:00 A.M.) 

NAACP LEGAL DEFENSE FUND: October 
3, 7:00 P.M. (Oct. 4, 9:15 A.M.) Octo- 
ber 17, 7 P.M. (Oct. 18, 9:15 A.M.) 

AYN RAND: October 3, 7:30 P.M. (Oct. 4, 
11 A.M.) October 17, 7:30 P.M. (Oct 
18, 11 A.M.) October 31, 7:30 P.M 
(November 1, 11 A.M.) 

STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC SO 
CIETY: Wednesdays, 7:00 P.M. (Thurs 
days, 9:15 A.M.) 

YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM 
Wednesdays, 7:15 P.M. (Thursdays, 
10:45 A.M.) 



der, organ; Bavarian Radio Chorus and 
Symph. Orch./Eugen Jochum. (Deut- 
sche Grammophon LPM 18 545/46) 
(Oct. 11) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 3) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
3) 

7:30 FILMS IN FOCUS Andrew Sarris 
reports on new films, and reviews the 
upcoming television scene, for your 
enjoyment and edification. (Oct. 3) 

8:00 MEDICAL ROULETTE #5: What 
You Don't Know About Hospitals in 
New York City Could Kill You This 
program treats the question of how to 
develop a system of community medi- 
cine that provides adequate medical 
care for the poor, especially now that 
Medicaid has been cut back. Produced 
by Lucy Komisar and the Public Af- 
fairs Dept. (Oct. 3) 

9:00 DRAFT COUNSELING A telephone 
talk-back program conducted by John 
Sonneborn, Executive Secretary of the 
New York Chapter of the Fellowship 
of Reconciliation. Mr. Sonneborn will 
give information and advice on legal 
means of avoiding the draft; listeners 
with specific questions can speak to 



Page 6 



WBAI 



Mr. Sonneborn while he is on the air 
by calling OX 7-8506. (Oct. 3) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediacy produced by 
the Public Affairs and News Dept. 
which is recorded too late for listing 
in the Folio. (Oct. 3) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 3) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY with Elisa- 
beth Vandermei, who plays recordings 
of new jazz, and other unusual sounds. 
(Oct. 7) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE More Bob 
Fass with friends and foes and fans 
and fugitives. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Could it be 
Larry again? 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 2) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 2) 

9:30 AMERICAN MUSIC QUINCY 
PORTER (1897-1966) String Quartet 
No. 8 Stanley Quartet of the Univ. of 
Michigan (CRI 118) DOUGLAS 
MOORE (1893- ) Quintet for Cla- 
rinet and Strings David Oppenheim, 
clarinet; New Music String Quartet 
(Desto DST-6425) VINCENT PERSI- 
CHETTI (1915- ) Symphony No. 4, 
Op. 51 Philadelphia Orch./Ormandy 
(Columbia ML 5108) OTTO LUEN- 
ING (1900- ) Symphony Fantasia 
Vienna Orch./F. Charles Adler (CRI 
103) (Oct. 8) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
2) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS By Andrew 
Sarris. (Oct. 2) 

11:30 DRAFT COUNSELING A rebroad- 
cast of the live program from last 
night. This program is on tape; lis- 
teners with questions will have to wait 
until next Wednesday, Oct. 9, to call 
Mr. Sonneborn. (Oct. 2) 

12:00 MEDICAL ROULETTE #5: What 
You Don't Know About Hospitals in 
New York City Could Kill You. For 
details, see Oct. 2 listings. 

1 :00 MODERN AFRICAN POETRY Mr. 
Ifanyi Menkiti, Biafran poet, talks 
with Bob Bisom about African poetry, 
and reads selections of poetry from 
different parts of Africa. The program 
also focuses on some key political and 
social trends which have influenced 
modern African poetic traditions. 
(Sept. 28) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL from 
that department. (Oct. 2) 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten. (Sept. 29) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Watkins Rock is not bugged by Bea- 
tles, but occasionally by other animals. 

5:00 MUSIC BY LOUIS MOREAU GOT- 



TSCHALK (1829-1869) A program of 
works by the 19th century American 
composer, performed by pianist Eu- 
gene List. (Vanguard VRS-485) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of up-coming events by 
Marjorie Waxman. (Oct. 4) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY on a specific legal 
problem that confronts the urban poor 
by a representative of the NAACP 
Legal Defense Fund. (Oct. 4) 

7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
Science fiction and fantasy reviews by 
Baird Searles and others. (Oct. 4) 

7:30 COMMENTARY by Ayn Rand, 
author and social critic. (Oct. 4) 

8:00 KINETIC ART Annette Michaelson 
interviews Mr. Brant Sloan, who has 
collected and organized numerous short 
films, some animated, and set up pro- 
grams on the East and West coasts. 
These films, sometimes termed "Ki- 
netic Art," come from many different 
parts of the globe. (Oct. 6) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester, with music, talk, interviews, 
phone calls, and whatever else pops 
into his head. When phone calls are 
being taken, listeners can reach Mr. 
Lester on OX 7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 4) 

11:00 SO YOU WANT TO GET RID OF 
YOUR WIFE A comedy for radio from 
the BBC. It features Lance Percival, 
Elizabeth Morgan, and Olga Lindo. 
The play was produced for the BBC 
by Archie Campbell. (Oct. 4) 

11:30 JAZZ AT HOME Chris Albertson 
presents the first of three programs 
devoted to a Town Hall concert that 
took place June 9, 1945. The three 
programs feature such musicians as 
Red Norvo, Stuff Smith, Teddy Wil- 
son, Gene Krupa, Slam Stewart, 
Charlie Ventura, Don Byas, Flip Phil- 
lips, Bill Coleman, Specs Powell, and 
pianist Billy Taylor, then not quite 24 
years old. The second program de- 
voted to this concert will be heard 
Oct. 10 at this time. (Oct. 4) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE with the 
unnameable . 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER A 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry, Larry, 
quite contrarry. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 3) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by a representa- 
tive of the NAACP Legal Defense 
Fund. (Oct. 3) 

9:30 MUSIC BY MAURICE RAVEL 
(1875-1937) Chansons Madecasses; Don 
Quichotte a Dulcinee Dietrich Fischer- 
.Dieskau, baritone; Karl Engel, piano; 
Aurele Nicolet, flute; Irmgard Poppen, 
cello (Deutsche Grammophon LPM 18 



615) Daphnis and Chloe (complete bal- 
let) Boston Symph. Orch./Munch (Vic- 
tor LM 1893) (Oct. 15) 

10:45 COMMUNITY BULLETIN 
BOARD Announcements. (Oct. 3) 

11:00 COMMENTARY by Ayn Rand. 
(Oct. 3) 

11:30 OF UNICORNS AND UNI- 
VERSES Science fiction /fantasy re- 
views. (Oct. 3) 

11:45 GROUP FOR CONTEMPORARY 
MUSIC AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSI- 
TY 1967-68, Concert #3 Works by 
David Saperstein, Dennis Riley, Ste- 
fan Wolpe, William Hibbard, Joan 
Tower, and Igor Stravinsky. (Sept. 21) 

1:00 REPORT FROM IRON MOUN- 
TAIN Leonard C. Lewin, who wrote 
the introductory material for Report 
from Iron Mountain on the Possibility 
and Desirability of Peace, talks about 
the report. (KPFA) (Sept. 29) 

1:30 HERBERT KROHN READS HIS 
VIETNAM POEMS Army doctor and 
winner of a Bronze Star, Herbert 
Krohn wrote these essentially lyric 
poems while in Vietnam. Produced by 
Martin Last. (Sept. 28) 

2:00 VIETNAMESE POETRY AND MU- 
SIC A program given at the Asia 
Society in June of this year. The 
poems read in this program are part 
of a forthcoming anthology edited by 
Mr. Nguyen Ngoc Bich, and the selec- 
tions range from about 300 A.D. to 
the present. Folk singer Steve Addis 
plays the guitar and the dan tranh, 
a Vietnamese stringed instrument; 
Andrea Miller reads. Produced by Bob 
Bisom; technical production by Mike 
Margolis. (Sept. 28) 

3:00 SO YOU WANT TO GET RID OF 
YOUR WIFE A comedy from the BBC. 
Details Oct. 3. 

3:30 JAZZ AT HOME The first of three 
programs devoted to a Town Hall con- 
cert of June 9, 1945, produced by 
Chris Albertson. For details, see list- 
ing Oct. 3. 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
Weary Blues. Poetry by Langston 
Hughes, with jazz by Charles Mingus. 

5:00 MUSIC BY CHARLES WUORINEN 
Piano Variations; Piano Concerto; 
Chamber Concerto for Cello and Ten 
Players Group for Contemporary Mu- 
sic at Columbia University. Symphony 
No. 3 Japan Symph. Orch./Watanabe 
(CRI 149) (Oct. 9) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A 
review of the events of the week in 
Washington, D.C., by WBAI's cor- 
respondent there, Steve Bookshester. 
(Oct. 5) 

7:30 SPECIAL REPORT A program of 
current interest from the News and 
Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 5) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW of the week's 
news by Hugh Romney. (Oct. 5) 

8:15 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh, teacher and speech ex- 
pert. (Oct. 5) 



WBAI 

8:30 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown, 
former national chairman of SNCC. 
(Oct. 5) 

8:45 COMMENTARY by Dore Ashton, 
art critic, and head of the Humanities 
Dept. of the School of Visual Arts. 
(Oct. 5) 

9:00 ELECTRONIC MUSIC OF HENK 
BADIN6S (1907- ) Capriccio for 
Violin and Two Sound Tracks (1952) 
Joke Vermeulen, violin; Genese (music 
for five audio-frequency oscillators) 
(1958); Evolutions (ballet suite) 
(1958). Electronic sounds realized in 
the Philips studios at Eindhoven, 
Netherlands (Epic LC 3759) (Oct. 6) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediacy from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 7) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 5) 

11:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 
r&b, Gospel, and other music. (Oct. 8) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob's 
show for mesomorphs (and early-ris- 
ing ectos, too). 



Page 7 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 



8:00 THE FRENCH BAROQUE ANDRE 
CAMPRA (1660-1744) Te Deum Phil- 
lippe Caillard Chorale; National Orch. 
of the Monte Carlo Opera/Fremaux 
(Westminster XWN-19041) FRAN- 
COIS COUPERIN (1668-1733) and SE- 
BASTIEN DE BROSSARD (1655- 
1730) Four Sacred Works Helmut 
Krebs, tenor; Fritz Demmler, flute; 
Helmut Schlovogt, oboe; Bruno Weis- 
senfels, Rudolf Reiprich, violins; Rich- 
ard Klemm, viola da gamba; Helma 
Bemmer, cello; Wolfgang Meyer, harp- 
sichord (Deutsche Grammophon ARC 
3193) MARC ANTOINE CHARPEN- 
TIER (1634-1704) Grand Magnificat 
Martha Angelici, Jocelyn Chamonin, 
sopranos; Andre Mallabrera, counter- 
tenor; Remy Corazza, tenor; Georges 
Abdoun, baritone; Chorale of the 
Jeunesses Musicales de France, Or- 
chestra Jean-Francois Paillard/ Louis 
Martini. MARIN MARAIS (1656- 
1728) Pieces a une et a deux violes 
August Wenzinger, Hannelore Muller, 
harpsichord (Deutsche Grammophon 
ARC 3170) 

9:30 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Laugh or cry with Ronny Watkins. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 4) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Hugh 
Romney. (Oct. 4) 

11:00 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh. (Oct. 4) 

11:15 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown, 
former national chairman of SNCC. 
(Oct. 4) 

11:30 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY by 
Steve Bookshester, from the capitol. 
(Oct. 4) 

12:00 SPECIAL REPORT from the 



News and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 

4) 
12:30 OLD TIME RECORD REVIEW 

#12 Old time country music. This is 
the summer substitute for Country Mu- 
sic whfch returns the week after next. 
(Sept. 29) 

1:00 COMMENTARY by Dore Ashton. 
(Oct. 4) 

1:15 MISCELLANY 

1:30 COHEN ON THE TELEPHONE 
Produced and narrated by Byron 
Bryant, with records from his collec- 
tion of Victrola classics. (KPFA) 
(Sept. 30) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ with Jack 
McKinney. 

4:00 THE SANTA PROBLEM A comedy 
for radio by Brian Thompson. It fea- 
tures George A. Cooper and Geoffrey 
Wheeler. Production for the BBC was 
by Alfred Bradley. 

4:30 LETTERS TO A YOUNG POET by 
Rainer Maria Rilke The series of let- 
ters written between 1903 and 1908 
by the poet Rilke to a young cor- 
respondent he was never to meet. The 
reading is by Erik Bauersfeld. (KPFA) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THE APPRENTICESHIP #31: 
Church and State This program, from 
the CBC, examines the rivalry between 
politicians and the Church for supre- 
macy in political matters in the pro- 
vince of Quebec from 1867 to 1877. 
Highlighted is a famous speech by 
Wilfred Laurier, a future prime minis- 
ter, on political liberalism. 

7:15 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS by 
WBAI's auto-scribe-in-residence (e.g. 
he lives on the premises), Sam Julty. 
(Oct. 6) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
William Mandel, author of Russia Re- 
Examined, reviews current Soviet pe- 
riodicals. (KPFA) (Oct. 6) 

7:45 THE LIBRARY, THE PUBLIC 
AND POLITICS: A Case Study An 
article in the July, 1967 issue of The 
California Librarian, read by the au- 
thor, Gregory Bergman, chairman of 
the Amador County Library Advisory 
Comm. Mr. Bergman tells of a pro- 
gram of community action to get a 
new library building and improvement 
in service in a sparsely populated 
Mother Lode county. (KPFA) (Oct. 

9) 

8:00 THE SYMPHONY OF THE NEW 
WORLD Kay Lindsey talks with Ben- 
jamin Steinberg, Music Director of 
the Symphony of the New World, and 
two of his outstanding cellists, Car- 
lotta Gary and Kermit Moore. (Oct. 
9) 

9:00 THE BARBED WIRE MAN High 
school students in the Summer Hu- 
manities Program at Connecticut Col- 
lege present a Wrath Rally to protest 
maltreatment of migrant workers. The 
program consists of original poetry 
and essays, and speeches by Arthur 
Bryant, Lynne Littmann, Dewey Mc- 



dtw 

DANCE 

theater workshop 

PRESENTS ITS 

Fall Season at 
the Theater of 
the Riverside Church 

121 ST. & ClAREMONT AVE. 

— four weekends — 
Oct. 18 -Nov. 10 

fri. & sat. eves, at 8:30 p.m. 

sun. mats, at 2:15 p.m. 

tickets $2 & $2.50 

3 different programs 

of contemporary dance 

13 choreographers 

9 premieres 



For information and 
tickets write to Theater 
Box Office or call 
749 - 7000 



Gowan, James Harris, June Meyer, 
and William Meredith. Produced by 
Ellen Jaffe; technical production by 
Gene Endres. (Oct. 11) 
10:30 THE QUARE FELLOW by Bren- 
dan Behan. This Spoken Word record- 
ing of Brendan Behan's famous play 
was a Radio Eireann Player's Produc- 
tion, and directed by Michael O hA- 
odha. It is a scathing indictment of 
capital punishment, as well as an 
astute exploration of guilt and re- 
sponsibility. (Oct. 6) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Subscribers Only: 
Listen Post-paid. 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 



8:00 MUSIC BY ANTON BRUCKNER 
(1824-1896) Intermezzo for String 
Quintet (Op. Posth.) Vienna Konzert- 
haus Quartet; Ferdinand Stangler, 
second viola (Vanguard VRS 480) 
Symphony No. 5 in B Flat Leipzig 
Philharmonic Orch. /Gerhard Pfluger 
(Urania URLP 239) 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic music from the world 
over, presented by the late Dr. Henry 
Cowell. (From the WBAI Archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES of operatic 
greats of the Golden Age, presented 



Page 8 



WBAI 



by the late Anthony Boucher. (KPFA 
Archives) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by 
WBAI's little old station manager, 
FAM, Jr. (Oct. 1) 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS by 
Sam Julty. (Oct. 6) 

11:00 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET 
PRESS by William Mandel. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 5) 

11:15 MISCELLANY 

11:30 THE QUARE FELLOW A per- 
formance of the Brendan Behan play. 
Details Oct. 5. 

1:00 ELECTRONIC MUSIC OF HENK 
BADINGS (1907- ) For details, see 
Oct. 4 listings. 

1:30 KINETIC ART Mr. Brant Sloan 
interviewed by Annette Michaelson. 
Details Oct. 3 

2:00 PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
The younger generation is Revolting! 

3:00 THE FUNERAL A play by Keith 
Waterhouse and Willis Hall, produced 
for the BBC by Alfred Bradley. 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Selections from 
the best of the week's Radio Unname- 
able programs, with Bob Fass as an- 
chorman. 

5:00 THE NEXT FIFTY YEARS #19: 
Housing Charles Abrams, head of the 
City Planning Division of the School 
of Architecture at Columbia, and first 
Rent Commissioner of New York, 
speaks about the future of housing. 

5:45 OLD TIME RECORD REVIEW #13 
The summer replacement for Country 
Music. The last program in the series 
on early country music, produced by 
the John Edwards Memorial Founda- 
tion at UCLA. Tom Whitmore and 
his friends will return to this time 
slot next week. (Oct. 12) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THEATER REVIEW Isaiah Shef- 
fer returns with his bi-weekly com- 
mentary on the current scene on, off-, 
and off-off Broadway, spiked with his 
usual mixture of optimism and cyni- 
cism. (Oct. 7) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Ellen Jaffe, director of WBAI's 
Young People's Programs, reviews a 
book or two or three of recent inter- 
est for children and young folks of 
all ages. (Oct. 7) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike, currently on the staff of the 
Center for the Study of Democratic 
Institutions. (Oct. 7) 

7:30 CONVERSATIONS Julius Lester, 
columnist for the National Guardian, 
talks with fellow activists about the 
movement. (Oct. 7) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Brief 
reviews of the week's openings in the 
arts, followed by general discussion 
and dissent among the reviewers who, 
this week, may or may not include: 
Ron Nelson for theater; Al Lees for 
film; Ruth Ramsay for music; and 
Baird Searles who presents the voice 
of moderation. (Oct. 7) 

8:45 GASCOIGNE'S WOODSMANSHIP 



The Tudor poet's view of the perils 
of public life, read by Joseph Busch. 
From the WBAI Archives. (Oct. 7) 

9:00 THEATRE, NEW YORK A once-a- 
month special on new companies and 
events off- and off-off Broadway. The 
news, reviews and interviews may 
be rescheduled for future broadcast. 
Produced by Sam Blazer. (Oct. 8) 

10:00 THE ENGLISH THEATRE SCENE 
#2 John Arden, author of Sergeant 
Musgrave's Dance, talks to Margaret 
Croyden about the necessity of writ- 
ing political plays in this, the second 
of a series of interviews recorded by 
Miss Croyden in England last summer 
for Pacifica. (Oct. 9) 

10:30 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD News 
and views by WBAI's Tana de Gamez 
(Oct. 8) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ presented 
by Ira Gitler. (Oct. 10) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE More of Steve — 
with his peccable taste. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 7 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry Jo- 
sephson's own way of opening the day 
is to shout it down. 

9:00 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike. (Oct. 6) 

9:15 THEATER REVIEW by Isaiah 
Sheffer. (Oct. 6) 

9:30 GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony No. 
9 Israel Philharmonic Orchestra/Paul 
Kletzki (Angel 3526) (Oct. 1) 

10:45 GASCOIGNE'S WOODMANSHIP 
For details, see Oct. 6 listings. 

11:00 CONVERSATIONS with Julius 
Lester and a guest. (Oct. 6) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Reviews 
and discussion on the arts. (Oct. 6) 

12:15 THREE Alan Dundes, folklorist 
and anthropologist at the Univ. of Cal., 
Berkeley, in a program from his 
KPFA series, Folklore. Mr. Dundes 
discusses an American culture pat- 
tern: the tendency to think and do 
things in threes. (KPFA) (Sept. 30) 

12:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Ellen Jaffe reviews some re- 
cent children's books. (Oct. 6) 

1 :00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL from 
that department. (Oct. 4) 

2:00 THE ROLE OF THE PRINCIPAL 
IN EDUCATION Dr. Daniel Dodson, 
Director, Center for Human Relations 
and Community Studies, N. Y. Univ., 
discusses the problems inherent in the 
managemnt of professional educators 
in this lecture. From the Midway 
#1229. 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY with Elisa- 
beth Vandermei. (Oct. 2) 

4:00 .YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
More speeches and songs from Ameri- 
can history, followed by a medley of 
American music — all the Americas. 

5:00 THE CREATURES OF PROME- 
THEUS, Op. 43 by Beethoven. For de- 
tails, see Oct. 1. 



6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
leading attorney to the revolutionary 
left. (Oct. 8) 

7:15 SCRAPS Chris Albertson with an- 
other whatchamacallit. (Oct. 8) 

7:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Drug Rehabilitation, Pace Setters for 
the Future This week's guest is Dr. 
Mitchell Rosenthal of the Addiction 
Services Agency. Produced by David 
Rothenberg of the Fortune Society. 
(Oct. 8) 

8:00 GAMELAN MUSIC OF BALI A 
collection of compositions representing 
the distinctive Balinese school of game- 
Ian music. (Lyrichord LL 179) (Oct. 

11) 

8:45 DIONYSUS IN 69 Three members 
of the cast, Bill Finley, Bill Shephard, 
and Sam Blazer, and one member of 
the audience, Victoria Barr, discuss 
this controversial production which 
brings players and audience into some- 
times intimate confrontation. Mr. 
Blazer leads the discussion. (Oct. 11) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediacy from WBAI's 
Public Affairs and News Dept. (Oct. 
8) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 8) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #12: 
A Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community On this program, 
a talk with a couple who has managed 
to maintain a long-lasting relation- 
ship, a difficult achievement in the 
gay world. The program opens with 
news and reviews. (Oct. 8) 

11:30 THE WOOLEN BANK FORG- 
ERIES A story by Keith Waterhouse, 
presented by the BBC. The reader is 
Bernard Cribbins. (Oct. 8) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob traf- 
fics for strange webs with Eastern 
merchants. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Larry, 
who refuses to apologize any more for 
the computer-confusion in subscrip- 
tion records. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 7) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(Oct. 7) 

9:30 GREGORIAN CHANT Tertia Missa 
in Nativitate Domini Nostri Jesu 
Christi (Christmastide, Third Mass 
during the day) Monks Choir of the 
Benedictine Abbey St. Martin, Beuron; 
Pater Dr. Maurus Pfaff, director 
(Deutsche Grammophon ARC 3143) 
Chants for Lent and Easter Choir of 
the Vienna Hofburgkapelle /Joseph 
Schabaser (Turnabout TV 34070S) 
(Oct. 16) 



Who 
killed 




the McCarthy 
campaign? 



Who's committing murder in Vietnam? 

Who's crushing heads in our streets and ghettos? 

Who's depriving our citizens of a voice in their government? 

Not just a worn-out President. Not just a frightened, 
misguided Congress. The force that killed the McCarthy peace 
drive was a wealth-dominated political system which has lost 
contact not merely with the people but with reality itself. 

The weekly Guardian recognizes this. We base our news and 
analysis on the fact. That's why we can offer you insights and 
alternatives, programs and strategies, that are not available 
through any other publication in the country. 

Among our recent and regular features: in-depth interviews 
with Eldridge Cleaver and H. Rap Brown ■ weekly dis- 
patches from Vietnam and Paris by correspondent Wilfred 
Burchett ■ Julius Lester (heard weekly on WBAI) with his 
popular column "From the Other Side of the Tracks" 

■ staff writer Carl Davidson analyzing the growth of the 
New Left ■ Staughton Lynd's column "The Good Society" 

■ labor reports and analyses ■ West Coast coverage by 
staff writer Robert L. Allen ■ regular book and record 



reviews ■ much more in 20 to 24 pages tabloid. 

Professor Herbert Marcuse calls us "the best radical paper in 
the country." 

Give us a serious look. 

Okay. Please enter my: □ one-year regular subscription I 
at $7. D one-year student or Gl subscription at $3.50 
(please include name of school). □ ten-week trial subscrip- 
tion at $1. My remittance is enclosed (in Canada and Latin 
America, on all but the ten-week trial sub, add $2, else- 
where outside the U.S. $3). 



Name- 



Add ress_ 



City. 



.State. 



-Zip. 



School. 



197 E. 4th St., New York, N.Y. 10009 wf 



Guardian 



independent 

radical 

newsweekly 



v ::::;v::::-::::::>:;::> : ;::;;::;::;*;;i::>:|/::v: : :: 



Page 10 



WBAI 



10:45 SCRAPS of Chris Albertson. (Oct. 
7) 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Drug Rehabilitation, Pace Setters for 
the Future produced by members of 
the Fortune Society. Details Oct. 7. 

11:30 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #12: A 
Program From and For the Homosex- 
ual Community Discussion with a 
homosexual couple that has maintained 
a long-term relationship. Details Oct. 
7. 

12:00 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD 
News and views by Tana de Gamez. 
(Oct. 6) 

12:30 THE WOOLEN BANK FORG- 
ERIES A story by Keith Waterhouse 
presented by the BBC. (Oct. 7) 

1:00 THEATRE, NEW YORK Reviews 
of current goings-on in the theatre. 
(Oct. 6) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL from 
the News and Public Affairs Dept. 
(Oct. 7) 

3:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 
r&b, Gospel, and other music. (Oct. 4) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Bonnie Tepper and Ed Woodard pre- 
sent Tuesday's Child. Then Nina Ser- 
rano Landau reads Part 3 of The Lit- 
tle Prince (Le Petit Prince) by An- 
toine St. Exupery. " 

5:00 AMERICAN MUSIC by Porter, 
Moore, Persichetti, and Luening. For 
details, see Oct. 3. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by 
Fiendish Frank, who tells of all the 
money we don't have. (Oct. 13) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the New York 
ACLU. (Oct. 9) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BUDDY ROGERS? "America's Boy- 
friend," who co-starred with "Ameri- 
ca's Girlfriend" (the late Nancy Car- 
roll) and married "America's Sweet- 
heart" (Mary Pickford) tells Lam- 
parski about it the way it was. Ima- 
gine! — Richard at Pickfair! (Oct. 9) 

8:00 LISTENING BACK #19 with Bob 
Brown. "Banjo Eyes at Carnegie Hall," 
featuring songs, stories, and anecdotes 
by Eddie Cantor. (Oct. 9) 

8:30 THE MOVIES Bob Sitton inter- 
views someone who is either in or who 
makes motion pictures. (Oct. 9) 

9:00 A TALK WITH FRITZ LIEBER 
The noted author of fantasy and spec- 
ulative fiction talks with Baird 
Searles about both of these fields, their 
present state and their future, plus 
touching on Shakespeare as fantasist, 
a subject he knows from his theatrical 
background. (Oct. 10) 

9:30 L'IMPATIENCE A cantata by Jean- 
Philippe Rameau for soprano, viola da 
gamba, lute and harpsichord. (Archive 
ARC 3123) (Oct. 9) 

9:45 PACEM POSTSCRIPTS Elisabeth 
Mann Borgese, author and Center Fel- 
low, in a succinct analysis of the pro- 
ceedings of the Pacem in Terris II 



Convocation which was sponsored by 
the Center. Also, a discussion of the 
convocation's implications for future 
developments. From the Center #406. 
(Oct. 9) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 9) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Gentle sounds of jazz, 
presented by the lady jazz-pianist, Ma- 
rian McPartland. (Oct. 9) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Mon- 
tages, mumbles, and more mystifica- 
tion by Bob F. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry the 
Switchman turns it on for you and 
you on for it. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 8) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant. 
(Oct. 8) 

9:30 MUSIC BY CHARLES WUORINEN 
See details Oct. 4. 

10:45 THE LIBRARY, THE PUBLIC, 
AND POLITICS: A Case Study For 
details, see Oct. 5 listings. (KPFA) 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BUDDY ROGERS?. Find out vicari- 
ously, through Richard Lamparski. 
(Oct. 8) 

11:30 LISTENING BACK #19 with 
Bob Brown. (Oct. 8) 

12:00 THE MOVIES with Bob Sitton. 
(Oct. 8) 

12:30 THE ENGLISH THEATRE 
SCENE #2 Margaret Croyden talks 
with John Arden, author of Sergeant 
Musgrave's Dance. Details Oct. 6. 

1:00 THE SYMPHONY OF THE NEW 
WORLD Kay Lindsey talks with Ben- 
jamin Steinberg, Music Director of 
the Symphony of the New World, and 
with two of his outstanding cellists. 
(Oct. 5) 

2:00 PACEM POSTSCRIPTS From the 
Center #406. For details see listing 
Oct. 8. 

2:45 L'IMPATIENCE A cantata by Ra- 
meau. (Oct. 8) 

3:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Recorded jazz. (Oct. 8) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
When the Spirit Says Sing with Bob 
Cohen. Then The Little Prince, the 
fourth and final part. 

5:00 THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY: The 
Burgundian School For details, see 
Oct. 2 listings. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 10) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
10) 

7:30 FILMS IN FOCUS by Andrew Sar- 
ris, who gives brief reviews of movies, 



in the houses>andon the telly. (Oct. 10), 

8:00 MEDICAL "ROULETTE #6: What 
You Dan't Know About Hospitals in 
New York City Could Kill You. This 
program examines some of the recent 
proposals to reorganize the hospital 
system, with special focus on whether 
hospitals ought to be controlled by the 
public or by private interests. Pro- 
duced by Lucy Komisar and the Pub- 
lic Affairs Dept. (Oct. 10) 

9:00 DRAFT COUNSELING A tele- 
phone talk-back program conducted by 
John Sonneborn, Executive Secretary 
of the New York Chapter of the Fel- 
lowship of Reconciliation. Mr. Sonne- 
born will give information and advice 
on legal means of avoiding the draft. 
Listeners who wish to ask specific 
questions of Mr. Sonneborn while he 
is on the air can do so by calling OX 
7-8506. (Oct. 10) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL From 
that department, a program of imme- 
diacy which is produced too late for 
detailed listing here. (Oct. 10) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 10) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY with Elisa- 
beth Vandermei. (Oct. 14) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
and his train of spectres and spirits 
(and sprites). 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry rings 
the matin bell; who sings the psalms? 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 9) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 9) 

9:30 SONGS BY RICHARD STRAUSS 
Eight Songs Gerard Souzay, baritone; 
Dalton Baldwin, piano (Philips PHM 
500 060) Thirteen Songs Anny Felber- 
mayer, soprano; Alfred Poell, baritone; 
Victor Graef, piano (Vanguard VRS 
431) Five Songs with Orchestra Elisa- 
beth Schwarzkopf, soprano; Berlin Ra- 
dio Orch./Szell (Angel S 36347) (Oct. 
14) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
9) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS reviews, by An- 
drew Sarris. (Oct. 9) 

11:30 DRAFT COUNSELING A rebroad- 
cast of the live program from last 
night. This program is on tape: listen- 
ers with questions will have to wait 
until next Wednesday, Oct. 16, to call 
Mr. Sonneborn. 

12:00 MEDICAL ROULETTE #6: What 
You Don't Know About Hospitals in 
New York City Could Kill You For 
details, see Oct. 9 listings. 

1:00 A TALK WITH FRITZ LIEBER 
Baird Searles talks with the noted 
author of fantasy and speculative fic- 
tion. Details Oct. 8. 



WBAI 



Page 1 1 



1:30 DMITRI SHOSTAKOVITCH Sym- 
phony No. 9 in E flat, Op. 70 Sympho- 
ny Orchestra of Radio Berlin/Rolf 
Klemperer (Urania URLP 7128) 
2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of last night's program 
from the Public Affairs and News 
Dept. 
3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira 

Gitler. (Oct. 6) 
4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Like a rolling stone, Watkins Rock 
falls into clear water near the left 
bank. 
5:00 19th CENTURY FRENCH MUSIC 
GABRIEL FAURE (1845-1924) Nine 
Songs Gerard Souzay, baritone; Dalton 
Baldwin, piano (Epic LC 3764) CESAR 
FRANCK (1822-1890) Piano Quintet in 
F Minor for Piano and Strings Jascha 
Heifetz, Israel Baker, violins; William 
Primrose, viola; Gregor Piatigorsky, 
cello; Leonard Pennario, piano (Victor 
LD 6159) 
6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of forthcoming events 
in and around N.Y.C. that are open to 
the public. (Oct. 11) 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 
7:00 CAMPAIGN COMMENTARY by 
spokesmen for political groups who 
would like to influence your vote in 
November. (Oct. 11) 
7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
Science fiction and fantasy reviews, 
by Baird Searles and/or other sci-fi 
buffs. (Oct. 11) 
7:30 VOICE PROJECT Another in the 
continued series designed to present 
portraits of average people through in- 
terviews made on the street or at 
places of work, with special emphasis 
on New York's black communities. 
Recorded and produced by Donald 
Harper and Ken Dewey. (Oct. 11) 
8:00 THE BEWILDERED TROUBA- 
DOUR Don McLean, of the New York 
State Council on the Arts, went out to 
sing songs in Hudson Valley towns; 
instead, he found himself collecting and 
spreading news of what was happen- 
ing. He talks with Ellen Jaffe and 
Gene Endres about it. (Oct. 11) 
8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester with music, talk, interviews, 
phone calls, and whatever else pops 
into his head. When phone calls are 
being taken, listeners can reach Mr. 
Lester on OX 7-8506. 
10:30 NEWS 
10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 

(Oct. 11) 
11:00 THE DEATH OF CHRISTOPHER 
MARLOWE A discussion by the BBC's 
Dr. Leslie Hotson. (Oct. 13) 
11:30 JAZZ AT HOME Chris Albertson 
presents the second program of a 
three-part series devoted to a 1945 
Town Hall concert. For details, con- 
sult listing for Oct. 3, at this time. 
(Oct. 11) 
12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob 
Fass . . . now with GL-70. 




From Chopin Waltzes and Preludes to Beethoven Sonatas 
and Schubert Impromptus, we bring you a Festival of 
some of the most beautiful and thrilling music ever 
written for the piano. Each piece has a universal appeal 
and is able to conquer the most diverse audiences. 

These pianists from six different countries- Brazil, 
France, U.S.S.R., Czechoslovakia, U.S.A., and Hungary - 
will explore the exciting repertoire listed below. 

We are sure the series will bring you a great deal of 
satisfaction and urge you to order immediately. 

— «®> — 

1. Oct. 20 '68 From Leningrad— Russia's Bella Davidovich 

All Chopin: The 24 Preludes & Other Works 

By Special Arrangement with Sheldon Soffer 

2. Nov. 24 '68 From Paris— France's Jeanne-Marie Darre' 

All Chopin: The 24 Etudes & Other Works 

3. Dec. 8 '68 From Budapest— Hungary's Peter hrankl 

Schubert-Schumann: Impromptus, 
Carnaval & Other Works 

4. Dec. 22 "68 From New York— U.S.A. 's Claude Frank 

All Beethoven: Op. 1 10, Op. 1 1 1 & Other Works 

5. Jan. 19 '69 From Paris— France's Jeanne-Marie Darre' 

All Chopin: Six Waltzes, Four Ballades & Other Works 

6. Feb. 23 '69 From Prague— Czechoslovakia's Ivan Moravec 

Beethoven-Debussy: Pathetique Sonata, 
Feux d'artifice & Other Works 

7. Mar. 2 '69 From Prague— Czechoslovakia's Ivan Moravec 

Mozart-Chopin: Sonatas & Other Works; 
K 333; K 457 & Fantasies 

8. Mar. 26 '69 From Sao Paolo— Brazil's Joao Carlos Martins 

Brahms: Variations on a theme of Paganini- 
Book I & II & Other Works 

SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS: 

All 8 Concerts at popular prices: 

Orch. & Loge $27.50; 1st Terrace $22.00; 2nd Terrace $18.00 

Single tickets also on sale by mail: 

Orch. & Loge $4.50; 1st Terrace $3.50; 2nd Terrace $2.50 

Make checks payable and send to 

Philharmonic Hall, 65th & Broadway, New York City 10023. 

Enclose stamped self-addressed envelope. 



fl& 



Page 12 



WBAI 




AHVS 

95 



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Page 13 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1 1 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Larry 
Josephson and his Purple Schmutz 
Machine. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 10) 

9:15 CAMPAIGN COMMENTARY by 
one political party or another. (Oct. 
10) 

9:30 MISSA SANCTAE CAECILIAE by 
Haydn. For details, see Oct. 2 listings. 

10:45 COMMUNITY BULLETIN 
BOARD Announcements of events, by 
our Community Bulletin Broad. (Oct. 
10) 

11:00 VOICE PROJECT Interviews with 
"ordinary" people . . .like you and 
me. (Oct. 10) 

11:30 OF UNICORNS AND UNI- 
VERSES Science fiction and fantasy 
reviews, by Baird Searles and others. 
(Oct. 10) 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 BARBED WIRE MAN High school 
students in the Summer Humanities 
Program at Connecticut College pre- 
sent a Wrath Rally to protest mal- 
treatment of migrant workers. Details 
Oct. 5. 

1:30 GAMELAN MUSIC OF BALI A 
collection of compositions representing 
the distinctive Balinese school of game- 
Ian music. (Lyrichord LL 179) (Oct. 
7) 

2:15 DIONYSUS IN 69 Three members 
of the cast and one member of the 
audience discuss this controversial pro- 
duction. Sam Blazer leads the discus- 
sion. Details Oct. 7. 

3:00 THE BEWILDERED TROUBA- 
DOUR Don McLean with news of 
what's happening in Hudson Valley 
towns. (Oct. 10) 

3:30 JAZZ AT HOME Chris Albertson 
presents the second program of a 
three-part series. For details, see list- 
ing for Oct. 3. (Oct. 10) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
Malcom X Talks to Young People in 
an address given in New York to teen- 
agers from McComb, Mississippi. 

5:00 MUSIC BY BARTOK AND JANA- 
CEK BELA BARTOK String Quartet 
No. 2 in A Minor Hungarian String 
Quartet (Deutsche Grammophon LPM 
18 650) LEOS JANACEK Capriccio 
for Piano Left Hand and Chamber Or- 
chestra Hilde Somer, piano; Caramoor 
Festival Orch./Rudel (Desto DST- 
6427) Nursery Rhymes Caramoor Fes- 
tival Orch./Rudel String Quartet No. 
1 Smetana Quartet (Artia ALP 109) 
(Oct. 16) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A 
report of the events of the week in 
Washington, D.C., by Steve Book- 
shester, WBAI's correspondent there. 
(Oct. 12) 

7:30 SPECIAL REPORT on a current 




mmmj fyfytitht 



M-V.C. LIMBO *ST.MRRKS 

CLOTHING FOR THE WRY IN 
OR FRR OUT 67«f965B-(2l2) 



event of immediate importance from 
the Public Affairs and News Dept. 
(Oct. 12) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW of the week's 
news by Marshall Efron. (Oct. 12) 

8:15 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh, teacher and speech ex- 
pert. (Oct. 12) 

8:30 COMEMNTARY by H. Rap Brown, 
former national chairman of SNCC. 
(Oct. 12) 

8:45 ARTISTS EUROPE #1 Jeanne 
Siegel interviews Gio Pomodoro in 
Milan. The sculptor explains why he 
withdrew his work from the Venice 
Biennale and the difference between 
his sculpture and "Minimal Art." 
(Oct. 13) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediacy from WBAI's 
Public Affairs and News Dept. which 
is produced too late for detailed list- 
ing here. (Oct. 14) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 12) 

11:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 
r&b, Gospel, and other soul music. 
(Oct. 15) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE The In- 
ternational Fasscist Movement, (sic. 
pun) (also, sick pun). 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 



8:00 BEGINNING OF CONTEMPO 



RARY MUSIC ALEXANDER SCRIA- 
BIN Poem of Ecstasy, Op. 54 Boston 
Symph. Orch./Monteux BELA BAR- 
TOK Rhapsody for Piano and Orches- 
tra, Op. 1 Geza Anda, piano; Berlin 
Radio Symph. Orch./Fricsay (Deutsche 
Grammophon LPM 18 708) CHARLES 
IVES Central Park in the Dark New 
York Philharmonic/Ozawa and Peress, 
conds. (Columbia MS 6843) Three 
Places in New England (Eastman MG 
50149) CLAUDE DEBUSSY Jeux 
Vienna New Symphony/Max Gober- 
man (Library of Recorded Master- 
pieces LRM 509) 

9:30 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Discover new things, new worlds, with 
Ronny Watkins. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 11) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Marshall 
Efron. (Oct. 11) 

11:00 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh. (Oct. 11) 

11:15 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown. 
(Oct. 11) 

11:30 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY by 
Steve Bookshester, from Washington, 
D.C. (Oct. 11) 

12:00 SPECIAL REPORT from WBAI's 
Public Affairs and News Dept. (Oct. 

11) 
12:30 OLD TIME RECORD REVIEW 

#13 More old-time country music in 
this, the last program in the series 
which has been our summer substitute 
for Country Music. Tom Whitmore and 
his friends return tomorrow. (Oct. 6) 

1:00 A CENTURY AFTER From 
WBAI's 1963 Archives, a documentary 
on the relations between blacks and 
whites, produced by Chris Koch. 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC 
presented by Israel Young. 

4:00 RACISM from WBAI's 1962 Ar- 
chives, a panel discussion moderated 
by Murray Kempton. The participants 
are James Farmer, William Worthy, 
and the late Malcolm X. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THE APPRENTICESHIP #32: The 
Architect This program outlines the 
work of Canada's first prime minister, 
Sir A. Macdonald, from 1867 until his 
death in 1891. His famous three- 
pronged "National Policy" is de- 
scribed, as is a description of his last 
days. Produced by the CBC. 

7:15 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS by 
Samuel Jollity (ho ho ho). (Oct. 13) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
by William Mandel, author of Russia 
Re-Examined, who examines recent 
Soviet periodicals. (KPFA) (Oct. 13) 

7:45 WALLINGFORD RIEGGER Con- 
certo for Piano and Woodwind Quintet 
Harriet Wingreen, piano; The New 
Art Wind Quintet (CRI 130) (Oct. 15) 

8:00 CONFERENCE ON CAPITAL 
PUNISHMENT Jack Greenberg, Di- 
rector Counsel of the NAACP Legal 
Defense Fund, speaks about the his- 
tory of Capital Punishment. John Grif- 
fiths, Professor of Law at Yale, dis- 




Street photos by Ken McLaren 



PACIFICA COVERS THE 






Staff photos by M. Segelman 



DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION 















Page 16 



WBAI 



cusses the legal arguments against 
capital punishment. (Oct. 13) 

9:00 1968 SUNDANCE FESTIVAL OF 
THE ARTS Highlights from the pro- 
gram recorded in August of this year 
at Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania. 
BACH Sonata in A for Violin and 
Piano; Sonata in C Minor for Violin 
and Piano; Sonata in G for Violin and 
Piano James Oliver Buswell IV, violin; 
Fernando Valenti, hapsichord. Rec- 
orded and produced for WBAI by 
Matt Edwards. (Oct. 18) 

10:15 THE GORMENGHAST TRIL- 
OGY: A Discussion With Maeve Peake 
and Jonathan Williams When in 
England the American poet Jonathan 
Williams tape recorded conversations 
with a number of English writers. 
Mervyn Peake, author of the famed 
Gormenghast Trilogy, has been too ill 
to communicate but his wife Maeve 
talked interestingly and enlightening- 
ly with Williams about the books and 
the circumstances of their writing. 
Permission to use this tape was 
provided through the courtesy of the 
Library of the Univ. of California at 
Los Angeles, and Jonathan Williams. 
(Oct. 15) 

11:00 S. C. U. M. MANIFESTO Kay 
Lindsey talks with Ti-Grace Atkinson 
about the radical papers of Valerie 
Solanas. (Oct. 16) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Just Steve doing 
his thing. 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13 



8:00 CHORAL MUSIC BRAHMS Song 
of Destiny, Op. 54 Mildred Miller, 
mezzo-soprano; Occidental Concert 
Choir; Columbia Symph. Orch. /Bruno 
Walter (Columbia ML 5888) A Ger- 
man Requiem, Op. 45 Teresa Stich- 
Randall, soprano; James Pease, bari- 
tone; North German Radio Symph. 
Orch. and Chorus, Hamburg/Carl 
Bamberger. (Nonesuch HB-73003) 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic music, presented by the 
late Dr. Henry Cowell. From the 
WBAI Archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES of operatic 
singers of the bygone days, presented 
by the late Anthony Boucher. (KPFA 
Archives) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
You think it was bad last week. . . 
Frank Millspaugh strikes a new low 
with this week's report. (Oct. 8) 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS by 
Sam Julty. (Oct. 12) 

11:00 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET 
PRESS by William Mandel (KPFA) 
(Oct. 12) 

11:15 THE DEATH OF CHRISTOPHER 
MARLOWE A discussion by the BBC's 
Dr. Leslie Hotson. (Oct. 10) 

11:45 ARTISTS EUROPE # 1 Jeanne 
Siegel interviews Gio Pomodoro in 
Milan. Details Oct. 11. 



12:30 CONFERENCE ON CAPITAL 
PUNISHMENT Jack Greenberg 
speaks about the history of capital 
punishment, and John Griffith dis- 
cusses legal arguments against it. De- 
tails Oct. 12. 

1 :30 RUSSIAN SONGS TCHAIKOVSKY 
Three Songs from Op. 6 Galina Vish- 
nevskaya, soprano; Mstislav Ros- 
tropovich, piano. (Philips PHM 500- 
021) MUSSORGSKY The Nursery 
Netania Davrath, soprano; Erik Wer- 
ba, piano. (Vanguard VRS-1068) 

2:00 THE ORACLE: In Memory of David 
Sandberg and Neil Cassidy A program 
of readings by writers associated with 
the San Francisco Oracle. Sound and 
music performed by the Floating Lo- 
tus Opera Company and introduced by 
Allen Cohen. (KPFA) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY A week of 
Fass, compressed, and refined into this 
hour. 

5:00 THE NEXT FIFTY YEARS #20 
Irving Hand, president of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Planners, speaks 
about the nation's policy for its 
future. 

5:30 ANDRE JOLIVET Concerto for 
Flute and String Orchestra Jean- 
Pierre Rampal, flute; Lamoureux 
Orchestra / Jolivet (Music Guild MG 
141) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Tom Whitmore 
returns with more country music. Wel- 
come back, Whit. (Oct. 19) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 ON THE HARMFULNESS OF 
TOBACCO Actor Sir Michael Red- 
grave reads the Chekhov short story 



on Russian life. (Spoken Arts) (Oct. 
14) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Martin Last, of WBAI's Cri- 
tical People, reviews George Painter's 
Andre Gide: A Critical Biography, 
published by Atheneum. (Oct. 14) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike, curently on the staff of the 
Center for the Study of Democratic 
Institutions. (Oct. 14) 

7:30 CONVERSATIONS Julius Lester, 
columnist for the National Guardian, 
talks with fellow activist about the 
movement. (Oct. 14) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Reviews 
of the week in the arts. Among those 
who may be present at tonight's ses- 
sion are: Deborah Jowitt for dance; 
Murray Ralph for music; Gene Thorn- 
ton for art and architecture; Roger 
Greenspun for movies and Baird 
Searles, for moderation. (Oct. 14) 

8:45 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
NEW YORK, New York, new york 
Pacifica's Word Players in their debut 
production, an orchestrated montage 
of words about New York. Sources in- 
clude Sartre, Whitman, Wolfe, Love- 
craft, Berger, The New York City 
Handbook, and various guides dating 
back to 1867. The work is in three 
movements: a descriptive introduction, 
a lyric adagio on Central Park, and 
an allegro furioso finale, and there 
is an improvised verite interlude. The 
Word Players are Sandra Ley, Dona 
Marans, Albert Norton, and Julie 
Scherer, directed by Baird Searles. 
Technical production by Fred Fried- 
man. (Oct. 17) 




THE WORD PLAYERS at work. Sandra Ley, Baird Searles, Dona Marans, Albert Norton 
and Julie Scherer in NEW YORK, New York, new york. 



WBAI 



Page 17 



9:30 ALBAN BERG String Quartet Op. 
3 New Music Quartet (Bartok 906) 

10:00 LOWER EAST SIDE ORGANIZ- 
ER #1 Kay Lindsey talks with Jim 
Davies about what he has done on 
East Sixth Street, between Avenues 
B and C. This is the first of a four- 
part series of interviews with com- 
munity organizers on the Lower East 
Side of New York City. (Oct. 14) 

10:30 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD News 
and views with Tana de Gamez (Oct. 
15) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ presented 
by Don Schlitten. (Oct. 17) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE One just can't 
postulate Steve. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING A look at 
what the dawn dragged in. 

9:00 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike. (Oct. 13) 

9:15 ON THE HARMFULNESS OF 
TOBACCO Sir Michael Redgrave 
reads the Chekhov short story. 
(Spoken Arts) (Oct. 13) 

9:30 THE SONGS OF FRANCIS POU- 
LENC Rose Dercourt sings on record- 
ings with the late composer at the 
piano. The music includes Aire Ro- 
mantique, Nuage, La Grenouilliere, 
Avant le Cinema, and Three Polish 
Folk Songs. 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 CONVERSATIONS with Julius 
Lester and a guest. (Oct. 13) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE 
Reviews, discussions and floor fights 
on the various arts. (Oct. 13) 

12:15 LOWER EAST SIDE ORGANIZ- 
ER #1 Kay Lindsey talks with Jim 
Davies about what he has done on 
East Sixth Street between Avenues 
B and C. Details Oct. 13. 

12:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Martin Last reviews a newly- 
published biography of Andre Gide. 
(Oct. 13) 

1 :00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL from 
that department. (Oct. 11) 

2:00 EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY 
LIFE A panel discussion from the 
Univ. of Chicago's conference on The 
Uses of Knowledge: The University 
and the Community. The large and 
impressive number of panelists will 
be announced on this program. From 
the Midway #1230 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY Recorded 
jazz, and other new music, presented 
by Elisabeth Vandermei. (Oct. 9) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Richard Schiffman brings you The 
Real Story. 

5:00 SONGS BY RICHARD STRAUSS 
For details, see listings for Oct. 10. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
author of How to Stay Out of the 



Army. (Oct. 15) 

7:15 SCRAPS Assorted trivia from 
Chris Albertson's circular file. (Oct. 
15) 

7:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Another Look at Parole Parole Of- 
ficers and men on parole discuss the 
"rules." Produced by David Rothen- 
berg of the Fortune Society. (Oct. 
15) 

8:00 A PALESTRINA MASS Missa 
Papae Marcelli Regensburg Cathedral 
Choir /Theobald Schrems (Archive 
ARC 3182) (Oct. 17) 

8:30 SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT: A Com- 
munity Meeting on Lead Poisoning 
A recording of a public meeting on 
lead poisoning in children in the Bed- 
ford-Stuyvesant area sponsored by the 
Central Brooklyn Coordinating Coun- 
cil. Mrs. Ruby Fulmer is the moder- 
ator; the speakers include Glenn 
Paulson and Dr. Joel Buxbaum of the 
Scientists' Institute for Public Infor- 
mation; Ricardo Wilson, a member of 
the Student Health Organization; Paul 
DeBrul, Housing Director at Action 
for Progress, University Settlement 
House; and Rev. Grace Havenwaller, 
Center Director, Action for Progress, 
who speaks on her child's severe case 
of lead poisoning. (Oct. 16) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
From the News and Public Affairs 
Dept., a program of immediacy which 
is produced too late for detailed list- 
ing here. (Oct. 15) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 15) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #13: A 
Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community On this program, 
a conversation with several people 
who have openly admitted their 
homesexuality, and what the effect 
has been on their lives. The program 
opens with news and reviews. (Oct. 
15) 

11:30 "LOOK OUT WHITEY, BLACK 
POWER'S GON' GET YOUR MAMA!" 
Julius Lester talks with Kay Lindsey 
about his book of that title. (Oct. 15) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Fas- 
sicles of fine sound. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Charles Pot- 
ter writes lousy one - liners. Larry 
Josephson elaborates on this obvious 
truth. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 14) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(Oct. 14) 

9:30 FROM RENAISSANCE TO BA- 
ROQUE ADRIANO BANCHIERT 
(1567-2634) La Pazzia Senile (Madrigal 
Comedy) Sestetto Italiano Luca (Deut- 
sche Grammopon ARC 3136) Maren- 
zio GIOVANNI GABRIELI (1557- 
1612) Sacrae Symphoniae ad Canzoni 



JAZZ...LIKEITI8 
HOW IT HAS TO BE 



sen 



CVCIL TAYLOR 

DON CHIRRY 



LARRY CORYELL 
OATO BARBIKRI 



MtCHASL MAINmJER 



A TWO-RECORD SET INCLUDING 24 
PAGES OF NOTES. COMMENTS, SCORE 
EXCERPTS, WRITINGS AND PHOTO- 
GRAPHS. AVAILABLE AT RECORD 
STORES OR DIRECTLY FROM THE 
JAZZ COMPOSER'S ORCHESTRA AS- 
SOCIATION, INC.*), 261 BROADWAY, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10007, FOR $12.00 
(POSTAGE INCLUDED). 

In N.Y. please add applicable sales tax. 
Allow about 3 weeks for delivery. Over- 
seas please add $0.80 and allow about 
5 weeks for delivery. 

*) A non-profit organization. 



Choir and Brass Ensemble of the 
Gabrieli Festival / Hans Gillesberger 
(Bach Guild BG-611) HEINRICH 
SCHUTZ (1585-1672) Motet: Die Wor- 
te der Abendmahlseinsetzung Stutt- 
gart Choral Society / Hans Grishkat 
(Dover HRC-5244) Motet: Veni. rogo 
in cor meum; Deutsches Konzert Her- 
zlich lieb hab' ich Dich, O Herr Tele- 
mann Ensemble/Theodora Schulze 
(Amphion CL 2127) 

10:45 SCRAPS presented by Chris Al- 
bertson. (Oct. 14) 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Another Look at Parole. Presented by 
the Fortune Society. (Oct. 14) 

11:30 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #13: A 
Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community The effects on the 
lives of openly-admitted homosexuals. 
(Oct. 14) 

12:00 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD News 
and views, by Tana de Gamez. (Oct. 
13) 

12:30 THE GORMENGHAST TRILOGY: 
A Discussion with Maeve Peake and 
Jonathan Williams. Poet Williams 
talks with the wife of the author of 
Gormenghast about the trilogy. See 
Oct. 12 for details. 

1:15 WALLINGFORD RIEGGER Con- 
certo for Piano and Woodwind Quintet. 
(Oct. 12) 

1:30 "LOOK OUT WHITEY, BLACK 
POWER'S GON' GET YOUR MAMA!" 
Julius Lester speaks with Kay Lindsey 
about his book of that title. (Oct. 14) 



Page 18 



WBAI 



2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL from 
that department. (Oct. 14) 

3:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 
r&b, and Gospel music. (Oct. 11) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Tuesday's Child, never on Monday. 
Then Le Petit Prince, a condensed ver- 
sion read in French. 

5:00 MUSIC BY MAURICE RAVEL For 
details, see listings for Oct. 4. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Frank Millspaugh, Tyrant Extraordi- 
naire, presents his weekly tirade on 
the situation here. (Oct. 20) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the New York 
ACLU. (Oct. 16) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
JANE FRAZEE? The Queen of the 
B musicals talks about some of the 
features she turned out during the 
war years. Richard Lamparski re- 
corded this program in Hollywood 
where Miss Frazee is now a real es- 
tate agent. (Oct. 16) 

K:00 LISTENING BACK #20 with Bob 
Brown. This week, the first record- 
ings of the military band, including 
John Philip Sousa's famous band. The 
recordings were made at the turn of 
the century, and many more were 
recorded on Edison wax cylinders. 
(Oct. 16) 

K:30 RESISTANCE #1: Life in the 
Army The first in a series of three 
programs held last July in the Broad- 
way United Church of Christ, and 
sponsored by the organization, Re- 
sistance. In this program, John Sack, 
writer, journalist and author of M, 
the story of an American infantry 
company from Fort Dix to Vietnam, 
talks about Life in the Army. (Oct. 18) 

9:30 ARTS EXTRA A program or two 
of immediate interest from the Drama 
and Literature Dept. (Oct. 16) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY bv Dale Minor 
(Oct. 16) 

11:00 SONIA MALKINE sings French 
troubadour and other songs. (Oct. 16) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE B Fass 
tells why Die Politik ist keine exakte 
Wissenschaft. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Merry 

Larry Munch'ng and Musicking. 
9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 

(Oct. 15) 
9:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant. 

(Oct. 15) 
9:30 MUSIC BY BARTOK AND JA- 

NACEK For details, see Oct. 11. 
10:45 MISCELLANY 
11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 

JANE FRAZEE? Richard Lamparski 

interviews the queen of B musicals. 

(Oct. 15) 
11:30 LISTENING BACK #20 with Boh 



Brown. Details Oct. 15. 

12:00 SCIENTISTS SPEAK OUT: A 
Community Meeting on Lead Poison- 
ing A public meeting on lead poison- 
ing" in the Bedford- Stuyvesant area. 
For details, see listing for Oct. 14. 

1 :00 S. C. U. M. MANIFESTO Kay Lind- 
sey talks with Ti-Grace Atkinson about 
the radicals papers of Valerie Sola- 
nas. (Oct. 12) 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA A rebroadcast of 
the program of imemdiate importance 
from the Drama and Literature 
Dept. (Oct. 15) 

3:00 SONIA MALKINE sings French 
troubadour and other songs. (Oct. 15) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
When the Spirit Says Sing join Bob 
Cohen for half-an-hour of folk mu- 
sic. Then, A Lion's Tale, a modern 
fable written and read by Gershon 
Freidlin (remember the Tundlezeen ? ) . 

5:00 GREGORIAN CHANT For details 
of this concert, see Oct. 8 listings. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society 
(Oct. 17) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom (Oct. 
17) 

7:30 FILMS IN FOCUS Andrew Sarris 
with movie reviews of house and tele- 
vision showings. (Oct. 17) 

S:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
AND URBAN AMERICA The first 
program in a continuing series con- 
sisting of interviews and discussions 
on the cities' problems and develop- 
ments which relate directly to Fed- 
eral aid programs, financial and tech- 
nical. The series will detail the opera- 
tions of the huge Federal projects 
that are a mystery even to well-in- 
formed citizens. Where there is criti- 
cism of the purposes, handling, or 
success of such projects, these will 
also be aired. Produced by Steve 
Bookshester (Oct. 18) 

9:00 DRAFT COUNSELING A tele- 
phone talk-back program conducted 
by John Sonneborn, Executive Secre- 
tary of the New Yoik Chapter of the 
Fellowship of Reconciliation. Mr. Son- 
neborn will give information and ad- 
vice on legal means of avoiding the 
draft. Listeners with specific questions 
can speak to Mr. Sonneborn while he 
is on the air by calling OX 7-8506. 
(Oct. 17) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediacy from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. of WBAI. 
(Oct. 17) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 17) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY New mu- 
sic, jazz and other kinds, presented by 
Elisabeth Vandermei. (Oct. 21) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Con- 
found their politics, frustrate their 
knavish tricks. Long live Bob Fass. 




7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry Jo- 
sephscn with frogs and snails and 
puppy dogs' tails. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 16) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
the Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 16) 

9:30 TWENTIETH CENTURY VOCAL 
MUSIC FEDERICO MOMPOU (1893- 
) Combat del Somni Nan Merriman, 
mezzo soprano; Gerald Moore, piano 
(Angel 35208) ERIK SATIE (1886- 
1925) Socrate Violette Journeaux, Jan- 
ine Lindenfelder, Simone Pebordes, 
Anne-Marie Charpentier, vocal solo- 
ists; Paris Philharmonic Orch./Rene 
Leibowitz (Esoteric ES-510) DARIUS 
MILHAUD (1892- ) Les Choephores 
Genevieve Moizan, soprano; Helene 
Bouvier, alto; Heinz Rehfuss, baritone; 
Claude Nollier, narrator; Chorale de 
l'Universite; Lamoreux Orchestra/Igor 
Markevitch (Decca 9956) (Oct. 18) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by members of 
the Young Americans for Freedom. 
(Oct. 16) 

1 1 :00 FILMS IN FOCUS by Andrew Sar- 
ris. (Oct. 16) 

11:30 DRAFT COUNSELING A re- 
broadcast of Mr. Sonneborn's Oct. 16 
program. Listeners with questions will 
have to wait until next Wednesday 
night to call him. 

12:00 THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
NEW YORK, New York, new york A 
rebroadcast of the voice montage from 
Oct. 13. 

12:45 A PALESTRINA MASS For de- 
tails see listings for Oct. 14. 

1:15 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT AND 
CARL SANDBURG From WBAI's 
1962 Archives, a discussion about Chi- 
cago and its school of architects. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
repeat of the Oct. 16 program. 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ Don Schlit 
ten's Oct. 13 program, rebroadcast. 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Watkins Rock comes in many flavors: 
Vanilla Fudge, Blue Cheer and Cream. 

5:00 TWENTIETH CENTURY PIANO 
CONCERTOS BELA BARTOK Con- 
certo No. 2 for Piano and Orchestra 
Geza Anda, piano; Berlin Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra /Fricsay (Deutsche 
Grammophon LPM 18 611) SERGE 
PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 2 
in G Minor, Op. 16 Nicole Henriot, 
piano; Boston Symph. Orch./Munch 
(Victor LM-2197) 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of all sorts of civic, 
social, cultural, and freeish events. 
(Oct. 18) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 COMMENTARY on a legal problem 
confronting the urban poor by a rep- 
resentative of the NAACP Legal De- 
fense Fund. (Oct. 18) 



WBAI 



Page 19 



7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 

Science fiction and fantasy reviews by 
Baird Searles and staff. (Oct. 18) 

7:30 COMMENTARY by Ayn Rand, au- 
thor and social critic. (Oct. 18) 

8:00 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW 
FOR JURY DUTY Godfrey Lehman, 
author of the recent book with that 
title, talks with Elsa Knight Thomp- 
son about the jury system. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 19) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester with music, talk, interviews and, 
occasionally, phone calls from listen- 
ers (OX 7-8506, OX 7-2288). 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 

(Oct. 18) 

11:00 MESSENGERS OF PEACE Dale 
Ray and Jack Ring, members of the 
Messengers of Peace, an international 
delegation of young people working 
toward world unity and peace, tell 
Elsa Knight Thompson about the dif- 
ficulties and adventures encountered 
by the group in Costa Rica. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 18) 

11:30 JAZZ AT HOME Chris Albertson 
with the third and final program de- 
voted to the memorable 1945 Town 
Hall concert. For details on the per- 
formers, see listing for Oct. 4. (Oct. 
18) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE with Bob 
Fass, who has been a diver in deep 
seas. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry Jo- 
sephson plays "over the hills and far 
away." 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 17) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by a representative 
of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. 
(Oct. 17) 

9:30 MUSIC BY BRAHMS Trio No. 1 
in B Major, Op. 8; Trio No. 3 in C 
Minor, Op. 101 Isaac Stern, violin; 
Leonard Rose, cello; Eugene Istomin, 
piano (Columbia M2S 760) Variations 
in F Sharp Minor, Op. 9 Beveridge 
Webster, piano (Dover HCR-ST 7005) 
(Oct. 21) 

10:45 COMMUNITY BULLETIN 
BOARD A rebroadcast of the pro- 
gram from last night. 

11:00 COMMENTARY by Ayn Rand. 
(Oct. 17) 

11:30 OF UNICORNS AND UNI- 
VERSES A repeat of last night's pro- 
gram. (Oct. 17) 

11:45 1968 SUNDANCE FESTIVAL OF 
THE ARTS Bach at Upper Black Ed- 
dy, Penna. Details, Oct. 12. 

1:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
AND URBAN AMERICA A report 
from Washington. For details, see list- 
ing for Oct. 16. 



2:00 MESSENGERS OF PEACE An El- 
sa Knight Thompson interview. 
(KPFA) (Oct. 17) 

2:30 RESISTANCE #1: Life in the 
Army John Sack speaks in the first 
of three programs on this topic. (Oct. 
15) 

3:30 JAZZ AT HOME Chris Albertson's 
Oct. 17 program, rebroadcast. 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Thar She Blows! Whaling ballads and 
reading from Moby Dick. 

5:00 TWENTIETH CENTURY VOCAL 
MUSIC by Mompou, Satie, and Mil- 
haud. Details Oct. 17. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A 
report on events of the week in Wash- 
ington by our correspondent Steve 
Bookshester. (Oct. 19) 

7:30 SPECIAL REPORT A program on 
an important event of the week from 
the News and Public Affairs Dept. 
(Oct. 19) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW of the events 
of the week by comedian Dick Davy. 
(Oct. 19) 

8:15 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh, teacher and speech ex- 
pert. (Oct. 19) 

8:30 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown, 
former SNCC leader. (Oct. 19) 

8:45 POEMS BY MARTIN WEISS: A 
Young Poet's Involvement Poet Martin 
Weiss is 17 years old and many of 
these poems were written when he was 
16. The poems are remarkable for 
their language, their perceptive con- 
cern for the ailing homo sapiens and 
their fervor. The young poet is in- 
troduced by Martin Last. (Oct. 19) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
slot left open for a program of im- 
mediate importance from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 21) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 19) 

11:00 CHARLES HOBSON A treatise 
on some variety of soul music by our 
maitre. (Oct. 22) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
on why a great empire and little 
minds go ill together. 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 



:00 SACRED MUSIC BY FRENCH 
COMPOSERS GABRIEL FAURE 
(1845-1924) Requiem, Op. 48 Anne 
Marie Blansat, soprano; Pierre Mollet, 
baritone; Chorus and Orchestra of the 
Church of St. Eustache, Paris; Jean 
Guillou, organ /Father Emile Martin 
(Nonesuch H-71158) FRANCOIS POU- 
LENC (1899-1963) Stabat Mater Re- 
gine Crespin, soprano; Choeurs Con- 
certs du Conservatoire, Paris/George 
Pretre (Angel S 36121) ERIK SATIE 



(1866-1925) Messe des Pauvres Chorus 
directed by David Randolph; Marilyn 
Mason, organ (Esoteric ES-507). 

9:30 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Wake up — here's Ronny Watkins. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 18) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by Dick 
Davy. (Oct. 18) 

11:00 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh. (Oct. 18) 

11:15 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown. 
(Oct. 18) 

11:30 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY 
Bookshester on tape from last Friday. 

12:00 SPECIAL REPORT A rebroadcast 
of last night's program. 

12:30 COUNTRY MUSIC by Country 
Tom and friends. (Oct. 13) 

1:00 ON STORY TELLING A talk by 
Eudora Welty from WBAI's 1961 
Archives. 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF JAZZ 

4:00 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW 
FOR JURY DUTY The author of a 
book on that subject talks with Elsa 
Knight Thompson. (Oct. 17) 

4:30 POEMS BY MARTIN WEISS: A 
Young Poet's Involvement For details, 
see Oct. 18. 

5:15 BLACK THINK-TANK Bob Murphy 
talks with Courtney Brown, chairman 
of the Harlem Co-op and organizer of 
a "black think-tank." 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THE APPRENTICESHIP #33: On 
the Brink of Racial Warfare The dis- 
pute over publicly-financed denomina- 
tional schools in Canada during 1890- 
1896, which ultimately became a main 
issue in an election campaign. (CBC) 

7:15 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam 
Julty tells you how to pick a lemon. 
(Oct. 20) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
by William Mandel, author of Russia 
Re-Examinerd. (KPFA) (Oct. 20) 

7:45 POOR PEOPLE'S MARCH A docu 
mentary on the Poor People's March, 
recorded and produced for WBAI by 
Ellen Cohn. (Oct. 20) 

8:30 STEPHEN STEPANCHEV READS 
HIS POETRY The poet Stephen Ste- 
panchev has two books of verse, Three 
Priests in April and Spring in the Har- 
bor and a critical study, American Poe- 
try Since 1945 to his credit. In this 
poetry occasional he reads some poems 
from Spring in the Harbor and a group 
of very recent poems. The poet has 
recently received an award from the 
National Council on the Arts. He is 
introduced by Martin Last. (Oct. 22) 

9:15 MUSIC BY THOMAS TOMKINS 
Sung by the Ambrosian Singers with 
the In Nomine Players conducted by 
Denis Stevens (Experiences Anonymes 
EA-0027) 

10:00 FROM BEAUX ARTS TO THE 
BARRICADES An interview with Dr. 
Thomas P. Hoving, director of the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art and for- 



Page 20 



WBAI 



mer New York Commissioner of Parks, 
on the restoration of public institu- 
tions to the public. The interviewer is 
Frank Millspaugh. (Oct. 20) 

11:00 PEACE TALKS: An Election Year 
Fraud: An address given July 25th by 
Tom Hayden under the auspices of the 
Fifth Avenue Peace Parade Com- 
mittee. Hayden, first President of 
Students For A Democratic Society, 
organizer for the Newark Community 
Union Project, is also co-author of 
The Other Side, written after his 1966 
visit to Hanoi. He is currently Coordi- 
nator of the National Mobilization To 
End the War in Vietnam. (Oct. 20) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post decides 
to diet and O.D.'s on saccharine. 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 



8:00 VERDI'S REQUIEM Herva Hill, 
soprano; Fedora Barbieri, mezzo-so- 
prano; Giuseppe Di Stefano, tenor; 
Cesare Siepi, bass; Robert Shaw Cho- 
rale; NBC Orch./Toscanini (Victor 
LD6018) 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic music from all over, 
collected and presented by the late 
Dr. Henry Cowell. (From WBAI's 
Archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES Great operatic 
voices of the past, presented by the 
late Anthony Boucher. (From the 
KPFA Archives) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER 
Wails and moans from Mr. Mill- 
spaugh's Oct. 15 program. 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS Sam 
on cars. (Oct. 19) 

11:00 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET 
PRESS by William Mandel. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 19) 

11:15 POOR PEOPLE'S MARCH A doc- 
umentary produced by Ellen Cohn. 
(Oct. 19) 

12:00 PEACE TALKS: An Election-Year 
Fraud An address by Tom Hayden, 
rebroadcast from Oct. 19. 

1:00 FROM BEAUX ARTS TO THE 
BARRICADES Mr. Millspaugh inter- 
views Mr. Hoving. For details, see Oc- 
tober 19 listing. 

2:00 THE WEDDING A BBC Theatre 
production, written by Keith Water- 
house and Willis Hall and produced by 
Alfred Bradley. 

3:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM Is 
it a revolution? Or just REVOLT- 
ING? 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY A few chops 
of Fass. 

5:00 THE NEXT 50 YEARS #21 Joseph 
Fischer, President of Resources for 
the Future, talks about National Policy 
in the Field of Natural Resources. 

5:30 HAMLET: The Mad Scene From 
the work by Ambrose Thomas. Maria 
Callas, Nan Merriman, Ramon Vinay, 
The NBC Symph. Orch./Toscanini (An- 
gel 35664) 



5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Thirty minutes 
of the real thing, produced by Tom 
Whitmore. (Oct. 26) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THEATER REVIEW A few gems 
of the new season discussed by Isaiah 
Sheffer. (Oct. 21) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN The Sears Roebuck Consumer 
Guide of 1897, reprinted by Chelsea 
House Publishers, and edited by Fred 
L. Israel. Introductions by Richard 
Rovere and S. J. Perelman. A review, 
and some very interesting readings 
—all by Baird Searles, WBAI's Dra- 
ma and Literature. Department Di- 
rector. (Oct. 21) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike, currently a member of the 
staff of the Center for the Study of 
Democratic Institutions. (Oct. 21) 

7:30 CONVERSATIONS Julius Lester, 
author of Look Out Whitey! Black 
Power's Gon' Get Your Mama! talks 
with someone in the movement. (Oct. 
21) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE The 
weekly review of what's new in the 
arts. Participants vary but should in- 
clude Martin Last fcr art and ar- 
chitecture, Ruth Ramsay for music, 
Baird Searles for dance and moder- 
ation. (Oct. 21) 

8:45 GOVERNMENT AND REVOLU- 
TION IN VIETNAM Edward Opton, 
Jr., reviews the recent book of the 
above title by Dennis J. Duncanson. 
(KPFA) (Oct. 22) 

9:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
AND EDUCATION The first of new 
monthly series on this subject, pro- 
duced by Steve Bookshester of the 
Washington Bureau. At the time of 
writing we do not know which single 
topic this program will focus on but 
it will include comments on news in 
the world of education. (Oct. 23) 

10:00 THE ENGLISH THEATRE 
SCENE #3 English director Joan 
Littlewood on the need to bring Eliz- 
abethan joy back to the theatre in an 
interview with Margaret Croyden, who 
recorded this series last summer in 
England exclusively for Pacifica. (Oct. 
23) 
10:30 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD 
News and views with Tana de Gamez. 
(Oct. 22) 
11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ This week 
it's Ira Gitler's turn at the turntables. 
(Oct. 24) 
12:00 THE OUTSIDE Steve Post shows 
silent movies. Another in the series on 
the limitations of the medium. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry the 
J. denies all responsibility — or inter- 
est — in last month's one-liners. 

9:00 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike. (Oct. 20) 



9:15 THEATER REVIEW by Isaiah 

Sheffer. (Oct. 20) 
9:30 MUSIC BY KODALY AND BAR- 

TOK ZOLTAN KODALY (1882-1967) 
Six Songs from Hungarian Folk Music 
Lazlo Magda, soprano; Leonid Ham- 
bro, piano (Bartok 927) Duo for Vio- 
lin and Cello, Op. 7 Jascha Heifetz, 
violin; Gregor Piatigorsky, cello (Vic- 
tor LM-2550) BELA BARTOK (1881- 
1945) Music for Strings, Percussion 
and Celesta New York Philharmonic/ 
Bernstein (Columbia ML 5979) (Oct. 
22) 
10:45 MISCELLANY 
11:00 CONVERSATIONS Julius Lester 

and a guest. (Oct. 20) 
11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE The 
weekly review of events in the arts. 
(Oct. 20) 
12:15 GOODBYE AND GOOD LUCK 
From WBAI's 1961 Archives, Grace 
Paley reading her short story 
12:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN Baird Searles does Sears Roe- 
buck of 1897. (Oct. 20) 
1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of the Friday night pro- 
gram from News and Public Affairs. 
2:00 PHENOMENOLOGY AND MY- 
THOLOGY Charles H. Long, Assoc. 
Prof, in the Divinity School, The Univ. 
of Chicago, discusses the problems 
posed in studying these topics. From 
the Midway 1231. 
3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY More exactly, 
the sounds of last Wednesday's pro- 
gram by Elisabeth. 
4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM A 
version of American history you won't 
find in textbooks. Then, more Greek 
myths retold by Julie Harris and Rich- 
ard Kiley. (Spoken Arts). 
5:00 MUSIC BY BRAHMS For details 

see Oct. 18. 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 

America: Tana de Gamez. 
7:00 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
author of How to Stay Out of the Ar- 
my. (Oct. 22) 
7:15 SCRAPS Look out! Here comes 
Chris Albertson's unconscious. (Oct. 
22) 
7:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: The 
Female Ex-Convict Janet Spencer tells 
her story. Produced by David Rothen- 
berg of the Fortune Society. (Oct. 22) 
8:00 EARLE BROWN Ann McMillan 
interviews the American composer and 
they talk about music. (Oct. 24) 
9:00 BLACK PANTHERS KIDNAPPED 
David Hilliard, national captain of the 
Black Panthers Party, and Bobby 
Seale, the chairman, talk with Elsa 
Knight Thompson about the kidnap- 
ping of BPP members in Mexico while 
they were en route to Cuba. (Oct. 23) 
9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediate importance 
from the News and Public Affairs 
Dept. (Oct. 22) 
10:30 NEWS 



WBAI 



Page 21 



10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 22) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #14: A 
Program From and For the Homosex- 
ual Community This program will be 
devoted to a discussion of the sexual 
"Uncle Tom," and the public stereo- 
type of the homosexual. The program 
begins with news and reviews. (Oct. 
22) 

11:30 JAMES BALDWIN A speech that 
Mr. Baldwin gave before the World 
Council of Churches meeting in July, 
1968. (KPFA) (Oct. 22) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
starts, selling tickets to his vast stu- 
dio space. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry plays 
Sousa marches and Burl Ives — be- 
ware of the March of Ives. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 21) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(Oct. 21) 

9:30 MUSIC BY FRANZ SCHUBERT 
(1799-1828) String Quartet No. 9 in 
G Minor Endres Quartet (Vox VBX) 
Death of Lazarus (Religious Drama 
in One Act) Helmut Kretschmer, Inge- 
borg Reichelt, Rico Mente, Use Siek- 
bach, Barbara Troxell, vocal soloists; 
NDR Chorus; Philharmonic Orchestra 



of Hamburg/ Arthur Winograd (MGM 
E3526) (Oct. 23) 

10:45 SCRAPS by Chris Albertson. (Oct. 
21) 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
The Female Ex-Convict From the 
Fortune Society. (Oct. 21) 

11:30 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #14: 
A Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community Sexual "Uncle 
Toms" and other stereotypes. (Oct. 21) 

12:00 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD by 
Tana de Gamez. (Oct. 20) 

12:30 STEPHEN STEPANCHEV 
READS HIS POETRY For details, see 
listing for Oct. 19. 

1:15 GOVERNMENT AND REVOLU- 
TION IN VIETNAM A book review 
by Ed. Opton. (KPFA) (Oct. 20) 

1:30 JAMES BALDWIN A talk by the 
writer. Details, Oct. 21. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of last night's program 
from that department. 

3:00 CHARLES HOBSON A rebroadcast 
of Mr. Hobson's Oct. 18 program. 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Join Bonnie Tepper and Ed Woodard 
on "An Island Way Out in the Sea," 
inhabited by Tuesday's Child. Then, 
march high, march low — join the pa- 
rade! 

5:00 MUSIC BY KODALY AND BAR- 
TOK For details see listings Oct. 21. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 



7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER Our 

weekly micro-marathon led by the 
mega leader, Mr. M. (Oct. 27) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the New York 
Civil Liberties Union. (Oct. 23) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
CLAIRE WINDSOR? The luscious 
blonde of the silent screen tells Rich- 
ard Lamparski about the William Des- 
mond Taylor murder case and her 
Cadillac V-16. Miss Windsor is featured 
in Whatever Became Of ... ? Series 
Two, which will be available through 
WBAI in November. (Oct. 23) 

8:00 LISTENING BACK #21 Bob 
Brown's program this week consists 
of highlights from the historic 1939 
Halloween broadcast of Orson Welles' 
version of The War of the Worlds, 
which caused panic at the time. (Oct. 
23) 

8:30 THE MOVIES Bob Sitton talks 
with someone in the movie business 
about the art. (Oct. 23) 

9:00 RESISTANCE #2: Immigration to 
Canada The second of the three-part 
series with practical hints and helpful 
advice by people who have lived in 
Canada and those who have come back. 
Recorded in July at the Broadway 
United Church of Christ. (Oct. 25) 

9:30 JOSEF SUK Serenade for Strings 
in E Flat Major, Op. 6 Strings of the 
Kapp Sinfonietta /Emmanuel Vardi 
(Kapp 9054) (Oct. 25) 



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WBAI 
£ 30 East 39th Street 
C X New York, N.Y. 10016 



Page 22 

10:00 "READY FOR ANYTHING" Rob- 
ert M. Hutchins, President of the CSDI, 
on the advantages of a liberal educa- 
tion. The first in a series of seven 
programs recorded at a Colloquium 
on Education and Communication in 
a Dynamic Society. From the Center 
#436. (Oct. 23) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 23) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Recorded jazz by the love- 
ly lady pianist. (Oct. 23) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Is Bob 
Fass' sound good for sore ears? 



WBAI 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry the J. 
bends, spindles and mutilates his 
listeners. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 22) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabri- 
cant (Oct 22). 

9:30 MUSIC BY SERGE PROKOFIEV 
(1891-1953) Suite from 'The Prodigal 
Son' L'Orchestre des Concerts Co- 
lonne/George Sebastian (Urania RLP 
7139) Suite from 'Le Pas d'Acier' Mos- 
cow Radio Symph. Orch./Rozhdest- 
vensky Oratorio: On Guard for Peace, 
Op. 124 Zara Doloukhanova, mezzo- 
soprano; E. Talanov, alto; Combined 
Choirs and State Orch. of the USSR/ 
Samuel Sammessoud (Vanguard VRS 
— now out of print). (Oct. 25) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
CLAIRE WINDSOR? Richard Lam- 
parski with the silent screen star. 
(Oct. 22) 

11:30 LISTENING BACK #21 Bob 
Brown and Orson Welles. (Oct. 22) 

12:00 THE MOVIES A Bob Sittwn in- 
terview. (Oct. 22) 

12:30 THE ENGLISH THEATRE 
SCENE #3 Miss Croyden and Miss 
Littlewood. (Oct. 20) 

1:00 THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
AND EDUCATION A rebroadcast of 
the October 20th program. 

2:00 BLACK PANTHERS KIDNAPPED 
For details, see listing for Oct. 21. 

2:30 "READY FOR ANYTHING" Rob 
ert Hutchins on liberal education. 
From the Center #436. (Oct. 22) 

3:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM A rebroadcast of last 
night's program. 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Bob Cohen presents When the Spirit 
Says Sing. Followed by The White He- 
ron, a story by Sarah Orne Jewett, 
read by Judith Ackerman. 

5:00 MUSIC BY FRANZ SCHUBERT 
For details, see listings on Oct. 22. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by members of the 
Students for a Democratic Society. 



(Oct. 24) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by members of the 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
24) 

7:30 FILMS IN FOCUS Andrew Sarris 
on films — in festivals, in movie houses 
and on the little screen. (Oct. 24) 

8:00 AVOID VIETNAM IN LATIN 
AMERICA Arthur Melville, a Mary- 
knoll priest who was recently expelled 
from Guatemala after spending seven 
years there working with the people 
for social change, discusses American 
involvement in that country and in 
Latin America generally (KPFA) 
(Oct. 26) 

9:00 DRAFT COUNSELING John Sonne- 
born, Executive Secretary of the New 
York Chapter of the Fel lowship of Rec- 
onciliation, conducts a telephone talk- 
back program with information and 
advice on legal means of avoiding the 
draft. Listeners with specific questions 
can speak to Mr. Sonneborn while 
he's on the air by calling OX 7-8506. 
(Oct. 24) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL An 
hour left open for a program of. im- 
mediate importance from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 26) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 24) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY Keep up 
with the new sounds — mostly those in 
jazz — with knowledgeable Elisabeth 
Vandermei. (Oct. 28) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE If you 
say the magic phrase, Bob Fass will 
sing all the lyrics to Strauss' Artists' 
Life waltz. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry Jo 
sephson gets stuck half-way through 
the mimeograph machine. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 23) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 23) 

9:30 ITALIAN MADRIGALS Featuring 
works by Philippe de Monte (1521- 
1603) and including works by Maren- 
zio, Monteverdi, Rore, Gesualdo, Ar- 
cadelt, Wert, Verdelot, Willaert, Luz- 
zaschi, and Andrea Gabrieli. Deller 
Consort/ Alfred Deller (Bach Guild BG- 
639) Abbey Singers (Decca DL 710103) 
Nuovo Madrigaletto Italiano/Emilio 
Giani (Nonesuch H-71021) Prague Ma- 
drigal Choir/ Miroslav Venhoda with 
Musica Antiqua, Wien/Rene Clem- 
encic (Bach Guild BGS-70655) (Oct. 
28) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
23) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS reviews, by 
Andrew Sarris. (Oct. 23) 

11:30 DRAFT COUNSELING A rebroad- 
cast of the live program from last 




now on a remarkable recording 
available only from Pacifica. 
This informal interview with the 
late revolutionary was prepared 
during Che's only visit to the 
United States— when he ap- 
peared at the United Nations. 



Record Archives 
200 W. 57th Street 
New York, N.Y. 10019 

Please send me 

copies of the Che Guevara 
records at $5.95 each. En- 
closed is my check for 
$ <r 

Name 

Address 

City, State, Zip 



WBAI 



Page 23 



night. This program is on tape. List- 
eners with questions will have to wait 
until next Wednesday, Oct. 30, to call 
Mr. Sonneborn. 

12:00 EARLE BROWN For details, see 
listings Oct. 21. 

1:00 POETRY AND LINGUISTICS 
From WBAI's 1962 Archives, a talk 
by Dr. Roman Jacobson. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
rebroadcast of last night's program 
of immediacy from that department. 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira 
Gitler. (Oct. 20) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Under a fever tree, sit down with 
Watkins Rock and watch the traffic. 

5:00 LIEBESLIEDER WALZER by 
JOHANNES BRAHMS Op. 52 Benita 
Valente, soprano; Marlena Kleinman, 
alto; Wayne Connor, tenor; Martial 
Singher, bass; Rudolf Serkin, Leon 
Fischer, piano (Columbia ML 5636) 
Neue Liebeslieder Walzer, Op. 65 
Irmgard Seefried, soprano; Raili Kos- 
tia, alto; Waldemar Kmentt, tenor; 
Eberhard Waechter, baritone; Erik 
Werba, Gunther Weissenborn, piano 
(Deutsche Grammophon LPM 18792). 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcements of upcoming events 
that will take place in the metropo- 
litan area, and are open to the pub- 
lic, either free, or by contribution. 
(Oct. 25) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 CAMPAIGN COMMENTARY by 
spokesmen for a political group that 
would like to influence your vote in 
next month's election. (Oct. 25) 

7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
Science fantasy and fiction reviews 
by Baird Searles, and other people. 
(Oct. 25) 

7:30 VOICE PROJECT Another in the 
continuing series designed to present 
portraits of average people through 
interviews made on the street or at 
places of work, with special emphasis 
on New York's black communities. 
Recorded and produced by Donald 
Harper and Ken Dewey. (Oct. 25) 

8:00 ARTISTS EUROPE #2 Jeanne 
Siegel interviews Marisol in Venice 
at the 1968 Venice Biennale. The sculp- 
tress who represented Venezuela talks 
about the student riots that took place 
during the Biennale and her own 
sculpture. (Oct. 25) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester with music, talk, interviews, 
phone calls, and whatever else pops 
into his head. When phone calls are 
being taken, listeners can reach Mr. 
Lester on OX 7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 25) 

11:00 GUIDE TO THE CENTRAL PARK 
#1 The first of a series of readings 
devoted to a guide to Central Park. 
The book was published just after the 



park opened, and gives many details 
on the park that have been lost or 
forgotten. The writer's convoluted 
style is a delight. Read by Baird 
Searles. (Oct. 25) 

11:30 JAZZ AT HOME: The King Jazz 
Sessions Chris Albertson with the 
first in a series of Jazz at Homes de- 
voted to the Mezz Mezzrow 1945-47 
sessions on his own King Jazz label. 
Musicians include Sidney Bechet, Pops 
Foster, Sammy Price, Hot Lips Page, 
Danny Barker, Big Sid Catlett, Baby 
Dodds, and singers Pleasant Joe and 
Coot Grant. The program also includes 
some relevant talk by Mezzrow. (Oct. 
25) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Bob Fass 
presents the Minority Report. 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 



7:00 IN THE BEGININNG First light 
flumblings by BAI's bearded B-J 
(bagel jockey). 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 24) 

9:15 CAMPAIGN COMMENTARY by 
representatives from a political group. 
(Oct. 24) 

9:30 EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY 
MUSIC IGOR STRAVINSKY Sym- 
phony in E Flat, Op. 1 Columbia 
Symph. Orch. /Stravinsky (Columbia 
MS 6989) CLAUDE DEBUSSY Iberia 
Chicago Symph. Orch. /Reiner (Victor 
LM-2222) ANTON WEBERN Quintet 
for String Quartet and Piano Dorothy 
Wade, Ward Fenley, violins; Milton 
Thomas, viola; Emmet Sargeant, cello; 
Leonard Stein, piano (Columbia K4L- 
232) (Oct. 29) 



10:45 COMMUNITY BULLETIN 
BOARD Announcements of up-coming 
events. (Oct. 24) 

11:00 VOICE PROJECT Recorded in- 
terviews with "ordinary people" on the 
street. (Oct. 24) 

11:30 OF UNICORNS AND UNI 
VERSES Science fiction /fantasy re- 
view(s). (Oct. 24) 

11:45 JOSEF SUK Serenade for Strings 
in E Flat Major, Op. 6 Strings of the 
Kapp Sinfonietta/Emmanuel Vardi 
(Kapp 9054) (Oct. 22) 

12:15 BALL OF FAT Actress Marina 
Fairbanks reads the Guy De Maupas- 
sant classic about a Prussian invasion, 
some petit burgeoisie and a good-na- 
tured, big-hearted, crazy wonderful 
gal. From WBAI's 1963 Archives. 

2:00 GUIDE TO THE CENTRAL PARK 
#1 Baird Searles reads from the guide, 
published just after the park was 
opened. (Oct. 24) 

2:30 RESISTANCE #2: Immigration to 
Canada Hints and advice from those 
who've lived there (in Canada) and 
those who've come back. (Oct. 22) 

3:00 ARTISTS EUROPE #2 Jeanne 
Siegel speaks with Marisol in Venice. 
(Oct. 24) 

3:30 JAZZ AT HOME: The King Jazz 
Sessions, presented by Chris Albert- 
son. (Oct. 24) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM St. 
Crispin's Day, patron saint of shoe- 
makers. Put on your listening shoes. 
Then, Face to Face with Ron Mace. 

5:00 MUSIC BY SERGE PROKOFIEV 
For details see Oct. 23. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer, Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY A 
report of recent happenings in 




MARISOL with The Party, 1966. The live one is heard with Jeanne Siegel in ARTISTS 
EUROPE on October 24 at 8:00 D.m. 



Page 24 



WBAI 



Washington, D.C. by WBAI's cor- 
respondent there, Steve Bookshester. 
(Oct. 26) 

7:30 SPECIAL REPORT Analysis of an 
event of the week from the News and 
Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 26) 

8:00 A SATIRICAL VIEW of the week's 
news by a funny person whose iden- 
tity, at this writing, is unknown. Oct. 
26) 

8:15 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh, teacheV and speech ex- 
pert. (Oct. 26) 

8:30 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown, 
former national chairman of SNCC. 
Oct. 26). 

8:45 SOME UNUSUAL PEOPLE If 
you've ever wondered what it was like 
to be stared at for a living, join Rich- 
ard Lamparski who recorded this pro- 
gram backstage at the Coney Island 
Side Show with Dickie the Penguin 
Boy, Dollie the Ossified Lady, Jolly 
Jere (700 lbs.), and Jean the Tattooed 
Lady. (Oct. 27) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 
program of immediate importance, 
produced by members of the WBAI 
News and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 
28) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 

(Oct. 26) 
11:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r&r, 

r&b, Gospel, and other music. (Oct. 

28) 
12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Draft 

Fass, not beer. 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 



8:00 MUSIC BY KARLHEINZ STOCK - 
HAUSEN (1928- ) Zyklus Christoph 
Caskel, percussion (Time 58001) Ge- 
sang der Junglinge (Realisation in the 
Electronic Studio of WDR, Cologne) 
(Deutsche Grammophon SLPM 138 
811) Momente (1965 version) Martine 
Arroyo, soprano; Aloys Kontarsky, 
Hamond organ; Alfons Kontarsky, 
Lowery organ; Chorus and Members 
of the Radio Cologne/ Stockhausen 
(Nonesuch H-71157) 

9:30 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Fact or fantasy, Ronny Watkins speaks 
the truth. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 25) 

10:45 A SATIRICAL VIEW by a now 
you know satirist. (Oct. 25) 

11:00 EDUCATION COMMENTARY by 
John Marsh. (Oct. 25) 

11:15 COMMENTARY by H. Rap Brown 
(Oct. 25) 

11:30 CAPITOL NEWS SUMMARY by 
Steve Bookshester. (Oct. 25) 

12:00 SPECIAL REPORT from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. (Oct. 25) 

12:30 COUNTRY MUSIC presented by 
Country Tom and the Knish. (Oct. 20) 

1:00 AVOID VIETNAM IN LATIN 
AMERICA Al Silbowitz interviews 



Arthur Melville, recently expelled 
from Guatemala, now working with a 
group of the above title. For details, 
see Oct. 28 listings. (KPFA) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC 
Recorded folk music, for the most 
part. Presented by Israel Young. 

4:00 MARK VAN DOREN From WBAI's 
1961 Archives, a talk by the teacher, 
poet, playwright and critic. 

5:00 MISSISSIPPI TODAY An inter- 
view with Paul Brest who was an at- 
torney with the NAACP Legal Defense 
and Educational Fund, Inc., based in 
Jackson, Miss., from August, 1966 
to June, 1968. The interviewer is Scott 
Keech. (KPFA) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 THE APPRENTICESHIP #34: A 
Pillar of Fire A study of the ideas of 
two French-Canadian leaders, the 
moderate Wilfred Laurier and the 
more extreme Henri Bourassa, founder 
of the Montreal newspaper Le Devoir 
which is still an important moulder 
of public opinion in French Canada. 
This program is produced by the CBC. 

7:15 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS pre- 
sented by a car owner, Sam Julty. 
(Oct. 27) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
by William Mandel, author of Russia 
Re-Examined, who reviews some cur- 
rent Soviet periodicals, and, on this 
program, answers some questions from 
his listeners. (KPFA) (Oct. 27) 

8:00 INSURGENCY AND GUERRIL- 
LAS IN GUATEMALA Father Blase 
Bonpane, a Maryknoll priest who was 
exiled by his government, speaking in 
May at the Berkeley campus. In Guate- 
mala Father Bonpane was national di- 
rector of Cursillos de Capacitacion 
Social, which gained international 
recognition for its sucess in peasant 
organization. (KPFA) Oct. 27) 

8:45 PELVIS "Vaughn" and "Carol," 
two members of "Postal Employees 
Living Voluntarily in Sin," and Neil 
Mindel, who was recently fired from 
his job in the post office for "moral" 
reasons, talk about government-en- 
forced morality with Don Porsche. 
(KPFA) (Oct. 27) 

9:30 EMOTIONAL EDUCATION Bob 
Murphy talks with Dr. Goeffrey Lind- 
enauer, President of the Institute for 
Emotional Education. 

10:30 LO SPEZIALE An Opera Buff a 
by FRANZ JOSEF HAYDN (1732- 
1809) composed in 1768 for the private 
theater of Prince Esterhazy. Camerata 
Academica of the Salzburg Mozart- 
eum/Rolf Maedel (Epic LC 3739) 

11:15 A. W. O. L. Paul Obluda, staff 
member of the War Resistors League 
and the Committee for Draft Resist- 
ance, and two servicemen who are 
currently absent without leave, talk 
with Elsa Knight Thompson. (KPFA) 

• (Oct. 27) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE with Steve Post, 
at. loo* 



SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 



8:00 NINETEENTH-CENTURY PIANO 
MUSIC GIOCHINO ROSSINI (1792- 
1868) Selections from 'Sins of my Old 
Age'; Tarantelle Pur Sang; Prelude 
Pretentieux; Montento Homo; Asset 
De Memento; Dansons Luciano Sgriz- 
zi, piano (Nonesuch H71163) ROB- 
ERT SCHUMANN (1810-1856) David- 
bundlertanze Rudolf Firkusny, piano 
(Capitol P 8337) FRANZ SCHUBERT 
(1797-1828) Sonata in B Flat, Op. 
Posth. Vladimir Horowitz, piano (Vic- 
tor LM 6014) 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES Ethnic music from the world 
over, presented by the late Dr. Henry 
Cowell. (From the WBAI Archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES Great opera 
singers of yore, presented by the late 
Anthony Boucher. (From the KPFA 
Archives) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by 
WBAI's station manager, Frank Mill- 
spaugh. (Oct. 22) 

10:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS by 
Sam Julty. (Oct. 26) 

11:00 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET 
PRESS by William Mandel. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 26) 

11:30 SOME UNUSUAL PEOPLE 
Lamparski speaks with some people 
in the Coney Island Side Show about 
their unusual professions. Details Oct. 
25. 

12:15 INSURGENCY AND GUERRIL- 
LAS IN GUATEMALA Father Blase 
Bonpane, exiled by his government, 
speaking about it. Details Oct. 26. 
(KPFA) 

1 :00 A BEETHOVEN QUARTET String 
Quartet No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 18 No. 
4 Budapest String Quartet (Columbia 
ML 4577) 

1:30 A. W. O. L. Paul Obluda speaks 
with two servicemen who are at pres- 
ent absent without leave. Details Oct. 
26. (KPFA) 

2:15 PELVIS Members of the "Postal 
Employes Living Voluntarily in Sin" 
discuss their right to do so without 
government intervention. (KPFA) 
(Oct. 26) 

3.00 TEILHARD DE CHARDIN Father 
N. W. Wildiers, author of the recent- 
ly published book An Introduction to 
Teilhard de Chardin, is interviewed by 
John Delury. (KPFA) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY Choice morsels 
from the past week's Radio Unname- 
ables all spliced neatly together by 
the loving hands of Fass volunteers. 

5:00 THE NEXT FIFTY YEARS #22: 
Urban Transportation Charles Harr, 
chairman of Johnson's Committee for 
Preservation of Natural Beauty, and of 
the Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development, speaks about that 
subject. 

5:30 A LITTLE MASON CANTATA by 
W. A. Mozart (Library of Recorded 
Masterpieces LRM 503) 



WBAI 



Page 25 



5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC Tom Whitmore 
presents more of that music. (Nov. 2) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS 

6:45 A TRANSGRESSION The Anton 
Chekhov short story is read by Sir 
Michael Redgrave. (Spoken Arts) 
(Oct. 28) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Today's review is of Ingres by 
Robert Goldwater, published by Har- 
ry Abrams Publishers. The reviewer 
is Roger Rearick, Professor of Art 
History at Johns Hopkins University 
in Baltimore. (Oct. 28) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike, currently on the staff of the 
Center for the Study of Democratic 
Institutions. (Oct. 28) 

7:30 CONVERSATIONS Julius Lester, 
author of Look Out, Whitey, Black 
Power's Gon' Get Your Mama! speaks 
with a fellow activist about the move- 
ment. (Oct. 28) 

8:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Reviews 
individually, followed by general dis- 
cussion, of recent openings and hap- 
penings in the arts. Reviewers vary, 
but this week just may be Al Lees 
for movies, Ron Nelson for theatre, 
Deborah Jowitt for dance, and Baird 
Searles, who acts as moderator. (Oct. 
28) 

8:45 HUNGARIAN SKETCHES by 
BELA BARTOK. Chicago Symphony 
Orch. /Fritz Reiner (Victor LM 2374) 

9:00 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE 
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT Women 
working in the movement talk about 
how they became involved, and the 
kinds of directions the movement is 
taking. Produced by WBAI's Kay Lind- 
sey. (Oct. 29) 

10:00 REPORT ON MUSIC by Alan 
Rich, of New York magazine. (Oct. 29) 

10:30 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD 
News and views by Tana de Gamez. 
(Oct. 29) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten. (Oct. 31) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE with slovenly 
Steve. 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry re- 
turns, well-rested, to begin another 
week of Mourning Programs. 

9:00 COMMENTARY by Bishop James 
A. Pike. (Oct. 27) 

9:15 A TRANSGRESSION The Chekhov 
short story, read by Sir Michael Red- 
grave. (Oct. 27) 

9:30 MUSIC BY MOZART Symphony 
No. 36 in C Major, K. 425 ('Linz') 
Vienna Philharmonic Orch./Boehm 
(London LLP 286) Piano Sonata in B 
Flat Major, K. 333 Charles Rosen, 
pianist on the Siena Pianoforte (Eso- 
teric ESP 3000) Piano Concerto No. 12 
in A Major, K. 414 Rudolf Serkin, 



piano; Marlboro Festival Orchestra/ 
Alexander Schneider (Columbia ML 
5209) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 CONVERSATIONS with Julius 
Lester and a guest. (Oct. 27) 

11:30 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE Reviews 
of the arts. (Oct. 27) 

12:15 SYMPHONIC DANCE by PAUL 
HINDEMITH. Berlin Philharmonic 
Orch. /Paul Hindemith. 

12:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN Roger Rearick reviews Ingres. 
Details Oct. 27. 

1:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL The 
Friday program from that depart- 
ment, rebroadcast. 

2:00 A LEGAL MAP FOR PRIVACY 
Marc A. Franklin, Prof, of Law, 
Stanford Univ., discusses the tradi- 
tional aspects of privacy and law. 
Followed by PRIVACY AND THE 
WHITE HOUSE. Pierre Salinger, for- 
mer White House Press Sec, discusses 
two aspects of privacy in the White 
House: that of the President and his 
family as individuals and that of 
the President and his staff in the 
performance of their duties. Both these 
programs are, collectively, From the 
Midway #1232. 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY Jazz, and 
other new music, presented by Elisa- 
beth Vandermei. (Oct. 23) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM A 
new look at The Real Story with Rich- 
ard Schiffman. 

5:00 ITALIAN MADRIGALS For de- 
tails, see Oct. 24 listings. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer, Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
author of How to Stay Out of the 
Army, and civil rights attorney to the 
revolutionary left. (Oct. 29) 

7:15 SCRAPS and Shreds of Albert- 
sonian machinations. (Oct. 29) 

7:30 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Playing Games with Your Life Teen- 
agers who have been in the courts but 
who have not served "big" times, dis- 
cuss the) J> attitudes about the fu- 
ture. This program is produced by 
David Rothenberg of the Fortune So- 
ciety. (Oct. 29) 

8:00 RESISTANCE #3: Life in Prison 
Last in the three-part series. Again, 
discussion by those who have been 
there. Vitally important for every 
young mother who wants the best for 
her boy. (Oct. 30) 

8:30 AGRICULTURE AND THE NA- 
TION The first program in a new, 
monthly series in which actions of the 
Commodity Credit Corp., the National 
Farm Bureau, and the Dept. of Agri- 
culture are reviewed and examined. 
Emphasis is placed on technological 
aids newly made available, issues of 
parity and price support, credit avail- 
ability, and crop insurance. The 
series is produced by Steve Book- 
shester. (Oct. 30) 



9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL A 

program of immediacy from the News 
and Public Affairs Dept. which is pro- 
duced too late for details to be pre- 
sented. (Oct. 29) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 29) 

11:00 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #15: A 
Program From and For the Homo- 
sexual Community A discussion about, 
and perhaps with, the younger homo- 
sexual, his particular problems, and 
reaction to the gay world. The pro- 
gram opens with news and reviews. 
(Oct. 29) 

11:30 MAN THE PRODUCER A pro- 
gram on science and technology in 
the service of man. The three par- 
ticipants heard in this program dis- 
cuss the three main divisions of this 
theme: Resources of Man; Man in 
Control ; and Progress. Produced by the 

cbc. (Oct. 30; 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE A truly 
fasscinating program. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING If you are 
lucky, Larry will be here on time. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 28) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(Oct. 28) 

9:30 MUSIC BY IGOR STRAVINSKY 
Feu d' Artifice, Op. 4; Ode Philharmo- 
nic Symph* Orch. of New York / Stra- 
vinsky (Columbia ML 4398) Serenade 
in A Marcelle Mever, piano (Haydn 
Society HSL-113) Mavra (opera in one 
act) Susan Belinck, soprano; Mary 
Simmons, mezzo-soprano; Patricia Ri- 
deout, contralto; Stanley Kolk, tenor; 
CBC Symph. Orch. / Stravinsky Agon 
Boston Symph. Orch./Leinsdorf (Vic- 
tor LSC-2879) (Oct. 30) 

10:45 SCRAPS of Chris Albertson. 
(Oct. 28) 

11:00 BOTH SIDES OF THE BARS: 
Playing Games with Your Life Pre- 
sented by the Fortune Society. Details 
Oct. 28. 

11:30 THE NEW SYMPOSIUM #15: 
A Program From and Foe the Homo- 
sexual Community Discussion about 
and maybe with young homosexual 
people. (Oct. 28) 

12:00 LATIN AMERICAN WORLD News 
and views by Tana de Gamez. (Oct. 27) 

12:30 REPORT ON MUSIC by Alan 
Rich. (Oct. 27) 

1:00 AN INTRODUCTION TO THE 
WOMEN'S MOVEMENT Working 
women in the movement talk about 
their involvement and goals. (Oct. 27) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL From 
that department, the Oct. 28 pro- 
gram rebroadcast. 

3:00 CHARLES HOBSON presents r & b, 
r & r, Gospel, and other soul music. 
(Oct. 25) 



Page 26 



WBAI 



4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
Tuesday's Child A bonnie day indeed! 
Then, we hear White House or Bust, 

elephants and donkeys in the political 
circus. 

5:00 EARLY TWENTIETH - CENTURY 
MUSIC by Stravinsky, Debussy and 
Webern. For details, see Oct. 25. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by 
that sttave, sophisticated station man- 
ager, Frank Millspaugh, who explains 
the station's present crisis, the na- 
ture of which is not available at the 
writing of this Folio. (Nov. 2) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant, 
Legislative Director of the NY ACLU. 
(Oct. 30) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BILLY HALOP? One of the original 
"Dead End Kids" (the good-looking 
one) discusses the fact that the boys 
were never good friends. Richard Lam- 
parski, who is visiting with Halop in 
Hollywood, asks about Billy's career 
in radio playing "Bobby Benson" and 
the disadvantage of the "Dead End 
Kid" image. (Oct. 30) 

8:00 THE MONTH IN REVIEW by 
editors of Monthly Review magazine. 
COct. 30) 

8:30 MARATHON JAZZ A special pro- 
gram for which Chris Albertson has 
assembled some memorable jazz per- 
formances from WBAI's first mara- 
thon. Featured in these July, 1965 
recordings are singer Joe Williams, 
accompanied by pianist Roger Kella- 
way; trombonist Grachen Moncur III, 
with pianist Herbie Hancock; the late 
Dave Lambert, introducing an unre< 
leased tape of his Dave Lambert and 
Co. vocal group; pianist Mae Tatum; 
Art Farmer, with Ray Bryant, Bob 
Cunningham and Candy Finch; and 
the Ray Bryant Trio, with Bob Cun- 
ningham and drummer Mickey Roker. 
(To be rebroadcast in November) 

9 :30 ARTS EXTRA from the Drama and 
Literature Department, a program of 
immediacy which is produced too late 
for detailed listing in the Folio. (Oct. 
30) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 30) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Jazz, presented by the lady 
pianist. (Oct. 30) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Striped 
Fass and his school of little fishes. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING Larry Joseph- 
son's what's happening. Home of the 
Now Sound, the In Crowd, the Here 
Look, etc., etc., etc. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 29) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Neil Fabricant. 
(Oct. 29) 



9:30 AMERICAN MUSIC AARON COP- 
LAND (1900- ) Music for the Thea- 
tre MGM Chamber Orch. / Izler Solo- 
mon (MGM E3367) ROBERT WARD 
(1917- ) Symphony No. 1 Vienna 
Symph. Orch/Dean Dixon (Desto DST 
6405) HENRY COWELL (1897-1965) 
Set of Five Anahid Ajemian, violin; 
Maro Ajemian, piano; Elden Bailey, 
percussion (MGM E3454) WALLING- 
FORD RIEGGER (1885 - 1961) Varia- 
tions for Violin and Orchestra Sidney 
Hart, violin; Louisville Orch./Robert 
Whitney (Louisville 601) CHARLES 
IVES (1874-1954) Decoration Day 
Finnish Radio Symph. Orch. /William 
Strickland (CRI 190) 

10:45 MISCELLANY 

11:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
BILLY HALOP? Richard Lamparski 
interviews the former "Dead End 
Kid." (Oct. 29) 

11:30 THE MONTH IN REVIEW by 
editors of Monthly Review magazine. 
(Oct. 29) 

12:00 MAN THE PRODUCER A pro- 
gram on science and technology in 
the service of man. Details Oct. 28. 

12:30 AGRICULTURE AND THE NA- 
TION First program of a new series 
produced by Steve Bookshester, and 
dealing with the above subject. De- 
tails Oct. 28. 

1:30 RESISTANCE #3: Life in Prison. 
A discussion among those who have 
been there. Details Oct. 28. 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA A program of im- 
mediacy in the fields of the arts. 
(Oct. 29) 

3:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND 
PROGRAM Recorded jazz, presented 
by Miss McPartland. (Oct. 29) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM: 
When the Spirit Says Sing with Bob 
Cohen. Then look out, you haven't 
got a ghost of a chance against our 
Halloween Show. 

5:00 MUSIC BY IGOR STRAVINSKY 
For details, see Oct. 29. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. Latin 
America: Tana de Gamez. 

7:00 COMMENTARY by members of 
Students for a Democratic Society. 
(Oct. 31) 

7:15 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
31) 

7:30 FILMS IN FOCUS Andrew Sarris 
gives brief reviews of movies in the 
houses, and on the idiot box. (Oct. 31) 

8:00 NEW YORK CITY An "open" pro- 
gram devoted to problems, issues, and 
events in this city. (Oct. 31) 

9:00 DRAFT COUNSELING A telephone 
talk-back program conducted by John 
Sonneborn, Exec. Sec. of the N. Y. 
Chapter of the Fellowship of Recon- 
ciliation. Mr. Sonneborn will give in- 
formation and advice on legal means 
of avoiding the draft. Listeners with 
specific questions can speak to Mr. 
Sonneborn while he is on the air by 
calling OX7-8506. (Oct. 31) 



9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIR SPECIAL A pro- 
gram of interest and immediacy from 
that department. (Oct. 31) 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 31) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY New and 
unusual music, presented by Elisabeth 
Vandermei. (Nov. 4) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE Fassen 
your seatbelts for another flight of 
fancy. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING If Larry 
should condescend to appear, you're 
in for one hell of a morning. 

9:00 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Oct. 30) 

9:15 COMMENTARY by Students for a 
Democratic Society. (Oct. 30) 

9:30 DIE WINTERREISE The song cycle 
by Franz Schubert. Dietrich Fischer - 
Dieskau, baritone; Jbrg Demus, piano 
(Deutsche Grammophon 139 201/02) 

10:45 COMMENTARY by members of 
Young Americans for Freedom. (Oct. 
30) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew 
Sarris. (Oct. 30) 

11:30 DRAFT COUNSELING A re- 
broadcast of the live program of last 
night. This program is now on tape. 
Listeners with questions will have to 
wait until next Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 6, to call Mr. Sonneborn. 

12:00 NEW YORK CITY A program 
about events, institutions, problems, 
in this city. (Oct. 30) 

1 :00 THE BOTTLE IMP As a Halloween 
surprise, we present this tale by Rob- 
ert Louis Stevenson, read by Isabella 
Fey. (From the WBAI Archives) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL a 
rebroadcast of last night's program. 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten. (Oct. 27) 

4:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 
Caryn Watkins and her Big Brother 
(watch you). 

5:00 IL GIARDINO D'AMORE A sere- 
nata by ALESSANDRO SCARLATTI 
(1660-1725) Catherine Gayer, soprano; 
Brigitte Fassbaender, contralto; Mu- 
nich Chamber Orch. /Hans Stadlmair. 

6:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
Announcemnts of up-coming events in 
this city. (Nov 1) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

7:00 THE MASQUE OF THE RED 
DEATH The Poe story is read by ac- 
tor Hurd Hatfield (SA992). (Nov. 1) 

7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
Sci fie and Sci fan reviewed by fie and 
fan buffs. (Nov. 1) 

7:30 COMMENTARY by Ayn Rand 
founder of the philosophy of Objec- 
tivism. (Nov. 1) 

8:00 PICKMAN'S MODEL In honor of 
Halloween, WBAI presents this read- 
ing of the H. P. Lovecraft story. The 
tape is somewhat of an enigma to 



WBAI 



Page 27 



us; it was found in WBAI's cellar, 
and the reader's name and recording 
date are now forgotten. (WBAI Ar- 
chives, 1964) 

8:30 THE GREAT PROLETARIAN 
CULTURAL REVOLUTION Julius 
Lester with music, talk interviews, 
phone calls and whatever else pops into 
his head. When phone calls are being 
taken, listeners can reach Mr. Lester 
on OX 7-8506. 

10:30 NEWS 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY by Dale Minor. 
(Nov. 1) 

11:00 GUIDE TO THE CENTRAL 
PARK #2. Another reading devoted to 
an 1874 guidebook to the newly opened 
Central Park in Manhattan. Many 
totally forgotten aspects of the park 
■are brought to light in the Stylishly 
Victorian phraseology of the author. 
The reader is Baird Searles. (Nov. 1) 

11:30 JAZZ AT HOME: The King Jazz 
Sessions Chris Albertson presents the 
second in a series devoted to Mezz 
Mezzrow's 1945 - 47 sessions on his 
own King Jazz label. For details on 
the performers, consult listing for 
Oct. 24 at 11:30 p.m. (Nov. 1) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE In honor 
of Halloween, Rosemary files a pa- 
ternity suit aginst Bob Fass. 

FOLIO CLASSIFIED 

No advertisement in this Folio is to be 
construed as an endorsement of any 
organization or business by WBAI or 
vice versa. 

Rate per insertion (3 line minimum) 
$1.00 per line. Send printed or typewrit- 
ten copy with check or money to WBAI 
Folio Advertising, 30 East 39th Street, 
New York, N.Y. 10016. OX 7-2288. Dead- 
line 4 weeks in advance of beginning date 
of Folio. All advertisements appearing 
in the Folio are addressed to all persons 
— no discriminatory ads, please. 

WBAI ADVERTISING RATES 

Full Page $250 1/3 Page $95 

2/3 Page $190 1/6 Page $50 

1/2 Page $135 1 Col., 3 in. $35 

Inside Back Cover: Full Page, $350; 2/3 
Page, $250; Half Page, $190; 1/3 Page, 
$140. 

Agencies get 15% discount. If you want 
to reach over 20,000 people in and around 
New York, get in touch with Molly Mc- 
Devitt, WBAI, 30 E. 39th Street, New York 
10016. 0X7-2288 

SIXTY RIBALD SONGS 

From Pills to Purge Melancholy 

Edited by S. A. J. Bradley. Guitar enthusiasts will de- 
light in these sixty original, singable, lusty songs 
from a robust 17th century collection that captures 
all the rousing good humor of Tom Jones' England. 
$6.50 at all bookstores, or from FREDERICK A. PRA- 
EGER, 111 Fourth Avenue, New York N.Y. 10003. 

FOLK GUITAR 

Learn traditional American styles quickly 

and almost painlessly from 

ROY BERKELEY 

(Folkways and Coral Records) 

CH 2-4972 or AL 5-0593 



EAR PIERCING 

The CONRAD SHOP will pierce your ears 
while you admire our collection of fine 
jewelry and sculpture. 

THE CONRAD SHOP 
108 Macdougal Street Phone: GR 3-5355 
Open 3 P.M. to 11 P.M., except Sundays 

SILK SCREEN PRINTING 

Workshop-Classes Covering All Methods 

Including Photographic 

PROCESS SYSTEMS 

254-0974 

ART CLASSES 

FREE BOOKLET — MAin 2-8025 

SAN ART STUDIO 
15 7th AVE., BROOKLYN 11217 

SERVICE for your Hi-Fi equipment. Stereo/ 
Mono. TV also. Nat Weintraub. IN 1-7459. 

WBAI staff member seeks 2 x / 2 room or 
larger apartment, East Side (23rd to 
86th), West Village or Brooklyn Heights. 
$100 max unless exceptional. Call Matt, 
OX 7-2288, morning after 9:00 A.M. 

AVAILABLE OPENINGS 

Lincoln Square Cooperative Nursery 

fchool, 5 W. 63rd Street, New York. 

799-0910. 

FOLK ARTS WEEKEND 

Oct. 11-13 in rural Conn. - Folkdancing 
with Dave Henry . . . folksinging . . . sq. 
dancing . . . arts . . . drama . . . pup- 
petry . . .hiking . . . Groove with an out- 
asite bunch that shares your interests. 
For reservations, call 343-9575. 



CORT COFFEE SHOP 
Is Proud To Announce: 

We have had 49% less food 

poisonings since we started 

dipping our bagels in Crest! 

10 E. 39 St. MU 3-9315 

Larry the Bagelman 

Perihelion Science Fiction: Stories, Car- 
toon Strips, Essays. 

Subscriptions: 6 issues for $2 - 12 for 
$3.60 c/o Sam Belloto, Jr. 190 Willoughby 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 11201. 

"One of the few magazines of its kind 
that can be seriously considered." Neal 
Conan, "Of Unicorns and Universes". 

NOVA EXPRESS — JUMP STREET 

Self-Help Anti-Poverty Program Needs 
Your Business Moving Jobs. Trucking. 
Odd Jobs. BE 3-5949 

APARTMENT NEEDED 

for a quiet, reliable type. West Village or 
Chelsea. Two or three rooms, under $100. 
No children or pets. Will purchase fix- 
tures if required. Len Ross, EN 2-8102, 
evenings. 



Students SAVE on one year magazine 
subs. Newsweek $5.00. Time $6.00. U. S. 
News $5.00. Playboy $6.50. Art News 
$5.75. Life $5.00. Reader's Digest $1.99. 
Look $2.60 ETC. Provide name, address, 
school, and year of grad. Send ck. or 
m.o. to: Student Periodicals, RD #7, 
Woodbridge, Connecticut 06525. Orders 
acknowledged day of receipt. LOVE? 






■ 




Photograph by Jim Bivona 





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— OM 



Photograph by Ben Fernandez. 



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